orographic lifting

orographic lifting

[¦ȯr·ə¦graf·ik ′lift·iŋ]
(meteorology)
The lifting of an air current caused by its passage up and over surface elevations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Orographic lifting had the potential to cause heavy rainfall as this flow reached the Coast Ranges.
Although many factors are considered by forecasters, including wind, stability, orographic lifting, and dynamic conditions related to the upper-level low, flash flood warnings would likely be issued sooner with very high GPS-PW values versus events with "typical" or marginal values of GPS-PW.
Large water drops can also be chucked into the atmosphere by the energy of a thunderstorm or orographic lifting.
In the world of meteorology, that is called orographic lifting.
Although the layers had that breaking-up-after-a-storm look, it was cold enough and there was enough orographic lifting to make what appeared to be benign clouds unflyable in an unprotected airplane.
As winds force air up a mountain, in a process known as orographic lifting, water vapor in the air condenses to form clouds, and further lifting "squeezes out" the rain.
What's more likely is the flight encountered an area of turbulence--probably the result of localized orographic lifting.