oropharynx


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oropharynx

[¦ȯr·ō′far‚iŋks]
(anatomy)
The oral pharynx, located between the lower border of the soft palate and the larynx.
References in periodicals archive ?
There was a high rate of human papilloma virus transmission between oropharynx cancer (OPC) patients with HPV+ mouth swabs and their spouses or partners," said first author Dr.
French head and neck oncology and radiotherapy group randomized trial comparing radiotherapy alone with concamitant radiochemotherapy in advanced stage oropharynx carcinoma.
Finally, paracoccidioidomycosis should also be differentiated from cancers of the oropharynx and larynx, most commonly the result of squamous cell carcinoma and lymphoma.
Gonorrhea was the most common infection and the oropharynx the most common site of infection.
The limited efficacy of standard of care treatment options means that 11,500 patients die every year from squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and the oropharynx in the United States alone.
The standard first-line treatment at our center for the removal of fish bones in the oropharynx and hypopharynx is flexible nasopharyngoscopy with a biopsy forceps.
The other half was suspended in sterile, water-based surgical lubricant and administered as a slurry to the oropharynx.
In an outline/bulleted format, chapters address general treatment principles; indications for surgery, radiation, or chemoradiation; anatomy, risk factors, signs and symptoms, staging, treatment, and follow-up for oral cavity, oropharynx, nasopharynx, larynx/hypopharynx, sinonasal, and thyroid carcinoma; recurrent cancer; and head and neck reconstruction.
Clinical examination of his oropharynx combined with flexible fibroscopy showed an elongated swollen uvula with ulcerations and diffuse fibrinous spots.
Patients with cancer in the oropharynx, which lies behind the oral cavity, and those with cancer in the hypopharynx, located at the bottom part of the pharynx, are more likely to have late-stage disease.
Radio-labeled drug deposition Studies show that 80%-85% of large-particle ICS in suspension aerosol never reaches the lungs, being deposited instead in the oropharynx.