appliance

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appliance

1. any piece of equipment having a specific function
2. a device fitted to a machine or tool to adapt it for a specific purpose
3. another name for a fire engine
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

appliance

[ə′plī·əns]
(engineering)
A piece of equipment that draws electric or other energy and produces a desired work-saving or other result, such as an electric heater, a radio, or an electronic range.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

appliance, appliance equipment

Any device (other than industrial) which utilizes gas or electricity as a fuel to produce air-conditioning, heat, light, refrigeration, or to perform one or more functions such as dishwashing; usually built in a standard size or type and installed or connected as a unit.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

appliance

A stand-alone hardware device or software environment dedicated to a specific task. See hardware appliance and software appliance.
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References in periodicals archive ?
1 Thorough examination of orthodontic appliance in patient's mouth prior to surgery and before closure of the surgical wound (appliance count and its integrity) 2 Use of molar band rather than molar tube for orthodontic treatment of patients undergoing orthognathic surgery 3 Being vigilant and cautious handling of intermaxillary fixation intraoperatively 4 Good communication with orthodontist to help prepare the patient for the scheduled surgery
Dental enamel around fixed orthodontic appliances after fluoride varnish application.
The application of UI is widely used also in patients with prosthodontics rehabilitations, titanium implants, and orthodontic appliances [16].
They have found a wide variety of applications: from hip prostheses, orthodontic appliances, prosthetic restorations, implants, and metallic plates (fracture repair) to surgical screws.
Biocompatibility of orthodontic materials is a real concern as clinicians do not want to place orthodontic appliances with a risk of adverse toxic effects in their patients.
When comparing different dental specialties, orthodontic appliances are the second most common dental foreign body to be ingested (5).
The current study was planned to evaluate the changes in OHRQoL 24h following the insertion of different fixed orthodontic appliance components, and to determine age and gender variations in OHRQoL following the insertion of such components.
Several studies have demonstrated that from 2% up to 96% of the patients with this kind of therapies could strongly develop conditions to increase the risk of WSLs in subjects with orthodontic appliances [3, 11-13]; indicating, in some cases, that more than 50% of subjects with fixed orthodontic appliances might experience an increased risk in the number of WSLs during the orthodontic treatment [14].
Many of the problems related to the usage of removable appliances can be overcome with the use of a simple fixed orthodontic appliance. One of the described simple fixed orthodontic appliances is the two-by-four (2 x 4) appliance which allows three-dimensional tooth movement that enables correction of not only the crossbite but also the rotated teeth, teeth with incorrect angulation and inclination, and diastema.
The orthodontic treatment of malocclusions includes the conversion of mechanical energy generated by fixed orthodontic appliance (FOA) forces to biological reaction in teeth and supporting tissues as gingival inflammation and retraction in response to tooth movement [1] which are considered as a low risk and noninvasive orthodontic procedures [2, 3].
Fixed orthodontic appliance is preferred over removable because fixed appliance acts as splinting, helps in stabilizing anchorage, and provides light continuous force which is not possible with removable appliances.