opa

(redirected from orthophthalaldehyde)
Also found in: Medical.

Office of Price Administration

Office of Price Administration (OPA), U.S. federal agency in World War II, established to prevent wartime inflation. The OPA issued (Apr., 1942) a general maximum-price regulation that made prices charged in Mar., 1942, the ceiling prices for most commodities. Ceilings were also imposed on residential rents. These regulations were gradually modified and extended by OPA administrators—notably Leon Henderson (1941–42), Prentiss H. Brown (1943), and Chester B. Bowles (1943–46)—until almost 90% of the retail food prices were frozen. Prices continued to rise, however, and new drives to secure compliance resulted; ultimately the OPA succeeded in keeping consumer prices relatively stable during the remaining war years. Besides controlling prices, the OPA was also empowered to ration scarce consumer goods in wartime. Tires, automobiles, sugar, gasoline, fuel oil, coffee, meats, and processed foods were ultimately rationed. At the end of the war rationing was abandoned, and price controls were gradually abolished. The agency was finally disbanded in 1947.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2022, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

opa

In a classical temple, a cavity which receives a roof beam.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
[13] stated that precolumn derivatization such as orthophthalaldehyde (OPA), naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde, or 4-dimethylaminoazobenzene-4'-sulfonyl chloride (dabsyl chloride) was able to provide accurate and stable chromatography baseline, but the reactions were unstable and affected by the sample matrix [18].
Liver (50 mg) and plasma (50 [micro]L) levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) were assayed separately according to the fluorometric orthophthalaldehyde (OPT) method reported by Hissin and Hilf [23].
External standard materials used as derivative reagents included an amino acid standard, 0.25 mM/[micro]L (Agilent Technologies), and glutatmine (Signa Aldrich, USA), OPA (orthophthalaldehyde) and FMOC