orthostat

orthostat

One of many large stone slabs, set as a revetment at the lower part of the cella in a classical temple, or at the base of a wall in the ancient architecture of Anatolia, northern Syria, and Assyria.
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In chapter one, the horse bridle frontlets from the Northwest Palace at Nimrud afford the springboard for Feldman's critical analysis of traditional methods of connoisseurship, as well as for her discussion of comparanda seen in such items as engraved tridacna shells and stone orthostat reliefs.
During the 2012 field campaign we noticed the existence of an engraving over the surface of the only orthostat that was still standing.
Pacifico was responsible for the commercial launch of OrthoStat, the company's first U.
These tombs are of unique construction (Figure 1): the backstone is a true orthostat, but the three stones to each side of the backstone are not orthostats but each leans on the preceding stone.
167-81) (4) stele depicting a Storm-god standing upon a bull, an orthostat of a tutelary deity similarly shown upon his stag, two double bull bases for images of columns, and a corner slab also featuring a bull.
32-37) that such an ordering also appears on the orthostat slabs found at the entrance of Alaca Hoyuk.
While there appears to be no landform, rock mechanics or sedimentary evidence that this was a Neolithic quarry site devoted to the extraction of bluestone orthostats destined for use at Stonehenge, or for any other purpose, we would accept the possibility that there may have been temporary Mesolithic, Neolithic or later camp sites here over a very long period of time, as in many other sheltered and wooded locations in north Pembrokeshire.
Their orthostats and capping stones are occasionally visible, though not at their original place.
For instance, in analyzing the Humbabahead orthostats (here conflated into one) from Tell al Rimah through the formalist methodology of Alois Riegl, Steymans avoids engaging with the scholarship of David Oates, Marie-Therese Barrelet, Theresa Howard Carter, and others on the original context and function of these reliefs.
16) This verb is used of overturning orthostats (KARKAMIS Ala [section]4) and of disturbing a tomb (KULULU 2 [section]5a).
In his provocative essay, Dentzer compares the sculpture of the Jebel al-'Arab, much of which decorated architecture or altars, to the sculpted orthostats of Hittite buildings.
Guterbock briefly discusses the acrobat scenes on the orthostats at Alaca and the bull-jumping scenes from Anatolia and Syria, before turning to KUB 25.