orthostat

orthostat

One of many large stone slabs, set as a revetment at the lower part of the cella in a classical temple, or at the base of a wall in the ancient architecture of Anatolia, northern Syria, and Assyria.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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In an open area known as the Lower Plaza, a long bench lined the front wall of the Palace of Kapara, providing a place for people to gather and sit; the back of each seat once featured a small carved orthostat, adding up to about 240 in total, each about 0.6m in height.
In chapter one, the horse bridle frontlets from the Northwest Palace at Nimrud afford the springboard for Feldman's critical analysis of traditional methods of connoisseurship, as well as for her discussion of comparanda seen in such items as engraved tridacna shells and stone orthostat reliefs.
Pacifico was responsible for the commercial launch of OrthoStat, the company's first U.S.
167-81) (4) stele depicting a Storm-god standing upon a bull, an orthostat of a tutelary deity similarly shown upon his stag, two double bull bases for images of columns, and a corner slab also featuring a bull.
The monitoring of pressure levels for the subsequent hours revealed that the patient had in clinostats average arterial blood pressure (PA) of 100/70 mmHg with an average heart rate of 78; in orthostats PA was 95/70 with average heart rate of 90.
"While there appears to be no landform, rock mechanics or sedimentary evidence that this was a Neolithic quarry site devoted to the extraction of bluestone orthostats destined for use at Stonehenge, or for any other purpose, we would accept the possibility that there may have been temporary Mesolithic, Neolithic or later camp sites here over a very long period of time, as in many other sheltered and wooded locations in north Pembrokeshire."
Their orthostats and capping stones are occasionally visible, though not at their original place.
Orthostats and megaliths were still standing; paving slabs and cultic stone objects located on them were preserved in situ, and a good part of the original plan of the sanctuary area could be clearly made out.
For instance, in analyzing the Humbabahead orthostats (here conflated into one) from Tell al Rimah through the formalist methodology of Alois Riegl, Steymans avoids engaging with the scholarship of David Oates, Marie-Therese Barrelet, Theresa Howard Carter, and others on the original context and function of these reliefs.
(16) This verb is used of overturning orthostats (KARKAMIS Ala [section]4) and of disturbing a tomb (KULULU 2 [section]5a).