ossicle


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Related to ossicle: middle ear ossicles

ossicle

[′äs·ə·kəl]
(anatomy)
Any of certain small bones, as those of the middle ear.
(invertebrate zoology)
Any of various calcareous bodies.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This induces an inertia-related phase lag between the ossicles and the surrounding bone, i.e., to motion of the stapes footplate in the oval window, leading to inner ear fluid displacements and pressure differences across the basilar membrane, and subsequently its displacement and a traveling wave.
Air in the anterior chamber of 3 eastern screech owl eyes may have occurred from a fractured scleral ossicle (arrow), leading to perforation of the globe at the level of the sclera behind the lid margins.
This can leave associated skeletal material in the form of isolated ossicles collected alongside more complete specimens insufficiently studied or completely ignored in favor of the articulated specimens.
Among the ossicles involved, the incus was the most commonly affected.
During ossiculoplasty, based on the condition of the ossicles, there are different methods ranging from minimal applications, such as bone cement or prosthesis applications performed in the absence of ossicles.
Instead, we used artificial and animal models, which allowed us to optimize the quality of the ossicle vibration sensing system."
This bone ossicle is situated superiorly to the dens of axis and differs morphologically from persistent ossiculum terminale or from odontoid fracture.
(2010a, 2010b) investigated the ossicles of the Cottidae, Cyclopteridae and Liparidae (Scorpaeniformes) and SEM imaged the taxonomically important tooth plates and gill raker tubercles of these fishes.
In the middle of the 16th century, the anatomists Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) and Giovanni Filippo Ingrassia (1510-1580) discovered the auditory ossicles in the tympanic cavity of the human petrous portion.
Of the three ossicles from the middle ear, the incus was often reported in literature to be the most eroded bone and the more distant from the inflammation focus [6, 7].
Meanwhile, since the tunnel was adjacent to the FN, ChT, EAC, and the ossicle, any damage of these structures, especially which of the FN, would lead to severe sequela to patients.
While viewing the ear through an operating microscope, the surgeon reshapes and transposes the bones, replacing an ossicle with a plastic substitute or grafting an ossicle from cartilage.