ossicle


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Related to ossicle: middle ear ossicles

ossicle

[′äs·ə·kəl]
(anatomy)
Any of certain small bones, as those of the middle ear.
(invertebrate zoology)
Any of various calcareous bodies.
References in periodicals archive ?
2009), our data on ossicle morphology and sculpture in the ancestors may help to clarify whether hybridization of flatfish species is expressed in their ossicle features.
The middle ear contains ossicles, nerves and muscles (stapedius and tensor tympani).
The os peroneum is an accessory ossicle located within the substance of the peroneus longus tendon and its location, size, and appearance are varied (Coughlin, 1999).
Corynebacterium endophthalmitis, glaucoma, and scleral ossicle osteomyelitis in a great horned owl (Bubo virginianus).
Junior Advanced Super (7and 8) (9 and 10) (11 and 12) skin cranium ganglion skeleton hard palate bronchiole orbit soft palate cementum pinna suture malleolus socket lymph node zygomatic globe dendrite lacrimal nasal space hormone ossicle ear canal sclera ethmoid brain stem stirrup epigastric spinal cord olfactory sacroiliac vertebra vomer inguinal tonsil uvula mesentery spleen epiglottis trigeminal root cricoid ischium lymph pharnyx lymphocyte vocal cord pectoral corpus callosum nervous system intercostal photoreceptor frontal lobe acetabulum pterygoid cornea vena cava maxillary sinus anvil subclavian foramen magnum
ganglion inguinal bronchiole mesentery cementum trigeminal malleolus ischium zygomatic lymphocyte lacrimal corpus callosum ossicle photoreceptor ethmoid pterygoid epigastric maxillary sinus sacroiliac foramen magnum
The paleontologist followed brain growth and ossicle position from early life through maturation.
An os trigonum is usually round or oval, with well-defined corticated margins, while a fractured lateral tubercle has irregular serrated margins between the ossicle and the posterior talus.
First comparisons with laser vibrometry measurements and computer simulation of ear ossicle movements [in German].
Smith 1989), prevents dissolution and promotes preservation of echinoderm remains even in settings where other skeletal elements have been dissolved away (Seilacher 1973; Donovan 1991b), thereby facilitating recognition of ossicle modifications as records of paleopathologic responses.
This article reviews a spectrum of accessory ossicle and sesamoid pathology and provides guidelines for the preferred imaging modality for the suspected abnormality.