ossify

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Related to ossified: Intramembranous, membranous ossification

ossify

[′äs·ə‚fī]
(physiology)
To form or turn into bone.
References in periodicals archive ?
The belly extends a little less than two-thirds the way down the lower leg and ends on an ossified tendon.
In so doing, it has to face and overcome the threats of scholasticism and Westernism, factors that had, hitherto, been difficult to deal with by a Muslim society that had become ossified and unwieldy, unable to challenge the modern Western customs and ideologies of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Let Hans Kung impeach the Catholic Church as an ossified institution, and he had James Carroll's fealty; let Martin Luther King accuse American society of racial bigotry, and he drew James Carroll to his banner; let Daniel Berrigan and Senator Eugene McCarthy arraign the American state for waging war in Vietnam, and they held James Carroll in thrall.
Of course, a particular company's rules and codes, explicit and implicit, do run the risk of becoming ossified.
Many have simply replaced the ossified with the trivial.
The trouble began when the pre-Vatican II church that many of us grew up in held on too long to the ossified rituals of Confession, which presumably served a largely immigrant Catholic population well.
Their skillful analysis of the varying social meanings of task and gang labor and slaves' gardens and provision ground restores interpretive vitality to discussions which, particularly in the contex of North American slavery, were in danger of becoming ossified by abstract typologies.
They oppose ossified interpretations of Islam that seek to inhibit modernism, and they do not consider their largely leftwing views as incompatible with Islam.
The skull was more completely ossified, to include the tightly articulated skull roof complex, although dental development was comparable to the more altricial specimens of the first litter.
The collapse of socialist governments in Eastern Europe, meanwhile, unleashed a tidal wave of consumer demand that had gone unsatisfied in the region's ossified state-controlled economies.
Five hundred years later and York and Leicester are both claiming the ossified remains of a hunchbacked tyrant.
The most obvious one is that the tumult of recent weeks in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, Yemen, Bahrain and most recently Oman, all reflect a broad desire among a populace to topple a regime that has ossified on its hitherto unshakable throne