ostensive


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ostensive

1. obviously or manifestly demonstrative
2. Philosophy (of a definition) given by demonstrative means, esp by pointing
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California's commencement of TK was the outcome of a policy with ostensive goals to blend and braid developmental science and high-quality early childhood with public schooling.
ORs are mutually constituted by its ostensive aspects (routine internalized as a standard, its ostensive aspect being the abstract and general idea of standardized routine) as well as by its performative aspects (routine in practice, based on context, where the performative aspect consists of actions, enactments by people, at a specific time and place), where the former invokes the resources to perform the action and at the same time hampers and constrains routine changes, while the latter generates, recreates, maintains and modifies the ostensive aspect (Feldman & Pentland, 2003; Pentland & Feldman, 2008).
The adoption of the adjective "ostensive" to stimulus, on the other hand, comes from Wilson and Sperber, as Morrisey does not use this qualification.
Jodlowiec presents an original theoretical framework addressing the complex and intricate nature of the process behind ostensive implicit and explicit communication.
There is a clean and intentional attention paid to each part in the pieces, yet they all read as something with an ostensive patina and history; as if each piece was grafted from its original whole to create what is standing in front of you.
Relevance theory claims that every act of ostensive communication is guided by the presumption of relevance, which enables people to draw inferences from the given stimulus.
Second, the book's title is somewhat inaccurate: despite its ostensive emphasis on "memory" (capacious in itself, as here it includes acts of free recollecting, official and unofficial commemorations, as well as politically driven manipulation), several authors examine the fortunes of historical narration; there is more truth in the first line of the introduction, which leads us to expect "a book about the presence of the past in the present" more generally.
And he might equally well take the name of a person, of which I give an ostensive definition, as that of a colour, of a race, or even of a point of the compass.
"The best example for what is ostensive ideology is represented by advertising, which has become the encyclopedia and the art of modernity."
At a second level, established through ostensive communication, common ground includes also general knowledge of enduring relevance.
The findings underscore marked and ostensive verbalisation as a distinguishing feature of secure mothers' well-attuned, affect-mirroring communication with their infants.
Artifacts are modified for and are supports to both ostensive and performative aspects of routines.