osteochondroma

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osteochondroma

[‚äs·tē·ō‚kän′drō·mə]
(medicine)
A benign hamartomatous tumor originating in bone or cartilage.
References in periodicals archive ?
Osteochondromas represent 36% of all benign bone tumors.
Osteochondromas commonly arise along the side of tendon insertions, with the direction of growth following the line of the tendinous pull.
Osteochondromas originate from a cartilaginous stage and arise from the metaphyseal surface of a bone.
Osteochondromas are the most-common bone lesions (30%-50% of resected, benign lesions).
The neoplastic pathogenesis of solitary and multiple osteochondromas.
Integrated PET/CT in evaluating sarcomatous transformation in osteochondromas.
Associated features are lipomas over other parts of the body or numerous bony excrescences resembling small osteochondroma or osteophytes (seen in Case 2) as well as associated secondary osteoarthritic changes and carpal tunnel syndrome in long-standing cases.
Secondary chondrosarcomas occur in preexisting benign car tilaginous neoplasms, such as a complication of a preexisting enchondroma or osteochondroma (1, 2).
Brachyury staining was further performed in the following 2 categories: (1) 58 nonchordomatous tumors, which included 26 chondroid tumors (4 cases of grade I chondrosarcoma, 9 cases of grade II chondrosarcoma, 3 cases of grade III chondrosarcoma, 2 cases of chondromyxoid fibroma, 1 chondroblastoma, 4 osteochondromas, and 2 cases of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma), 7 liposarcomas, 5 rhabdomyosarcomas, 4 pleomorphic adenomas, 4 mucoepidermoid carcinomas, 4 mucinous adenocarcinomas, 6 germ cell tumors, and 2 cases of renal cell carcinoma (Table 2); and (2) 7 unrelated miscellaneous tissues, which included normal cartilage derived from trachea (2 cases), articular surface (1 case), and testicular tissue (4 cases).
Cartilaginous tumors (such as osteochondromas, enchondromas, and chondrosarcomas) may produce irregularly shaped calcifications within their matrix that resemble popcorn on imaging studies (Figure 16).