osteoma

(redirected from osteoid osteoma)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms.
Related to osteoid osteoma: osteochondroma, osteoblastoma, enchondroma

osteoma

[‚äs·tē′ō·mə]
(medicine)
A benign bone tumor, especially in membrane bones of the skull.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Osteoid osteoma usually presents with nonspecific pain sensation, which increases during the night and responds well to NSAIDs (6,11).
Some tumors have a central sclerotic nidus similar to osteoid osteoma (Figure 7).
CT guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation has proved to be a very effective, minimally invasive, and safe technique that can be used in the treatment of osteoid osteoma, and has emerged as the treatment of choice in symptomatic lesions.
Ablations in bone benefit from the oven effect as the bone cortex traps heat within the medulla contributing to complete necrosis of the nidus in the case of osteoid osteoma. A standard safety procedure is to maintain a distance of 1cm from the probe to vital structures such as nerves, blood vessels and skin.
Recurrence rate is less than 10% with power burr.8 A new non-invasive radiation-free method is under observation - magnetic resonance guided focussed ultrasound ablation technique - which focuses ultrasound waves on osteoid osteoma.
Table 2 Common Locations of Pediatric Bone Lesions Epiphyseal Lesions Metaphyseal Lesions Diaphyseal Lesions Chondroblastoma Enchondroma Osteoid Osteoma Aneurysmal Bone Cyst Aneurysmal Bone Cyst Eosinophilic Granuloma Osteomyelitis Fibrous Dysplasia Osteofbrous Dysplasia Giant Cell Tumor of Bone Osteochondroma Ewing's Sarcoma (older) Unicameral Bone Cyst Nonossifying Fibromas Osteomyelitis Osteosarcoma Please Note: Illustration(s) are not available due to copyright restrictions.
Initial radiographic films (Figure 1) were read as unremarkable; however, given high clinical suspicion of osteoid osteoma, an MRI was obtained which demonstrated a circular hypointense lesion along the dorsal aspect of the trapezium (Figure 2) suspicious for an osteoid osteoma.
Histopathologically, the periphery of the cementum-like tissue presents more active growth, and sometimes, resembles osteoblastoma, osteoid osteoma, or atypical osteosarcoma, which are not distinctively related to tooth roots, and may be difficult to distinguish from these tumors [3, 5].
These reports suggested that the eccentric area could be an osteoid osteoma or a NOF.