Osteophyte

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Osteophyte

 

a small, circumscribed, single or multiple bony excrescence. An osteophyte is usually caused either by mechanical injury or by infectious inflammatory processes, for example, osteomyelitis and syphilis. Being asymptomatic in most cases, it is detected by roentgenography and does not require specific treatment. Osteophytes are surgically removed if they cause pain or restrict movement.

References in periodicals archive ?
These categories of abnormalities can be distinguished on the basis of either regional bone loss or deposition of additional bone, as in osteophytic lipping of vertebral centra, especially in the lumbar region of skeletons of older individuals (Figures 1 [V] and 6).
A fibrous band extended superiorly to the level of the mentum, where it was attached to an osteophytic nipple at the base.
(2-4) Abnormal motion may lead to an osteophytic spur at the pseudarthrosis, which may also impinge on the cuff.
Any signs of pressure such as redness, blisters, hard skin or extra bone developing (osteophytic formation) needs checking by a podiatrist.
An x-ray shows some mild joint-space narrowing in the medial compartment and osteophytic changes.
There were no signs of severe joint degeneration in the few joints observeable, save for a small osteophytic lesion (bony outgrowth) on the body of 5th lumbar vertebra, however muscle attachment sites were quite marked.
Osteophytic degenerations of the vertebral column are more common on the right than the left side of the body as reported by Lipschitz et al.
On the basis of osteophytic development and abnormally compressed spinous processes, he suggested that they came from a pack dog, the pathologies having developed in response to the stress of carrying an individual load.
A minor osteoarthritic problem of the lower back region is indicated in the lumbar and sacral bones by slight osteophytic lipping of the vertebral bodies (Kenndey 1989).
The AP projection with external rotation and the nonweight-bearing Grashey position demonstrated a large osteophytic spur and subchondral sclerosis.
The impact of osteophytic and vascular calcifications on vertebral mineral density measurements in men.
These irregularities do not implicitly need to be considered as a sign of osteophytic formation [9].