ostium

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Related to ostial: dyssynergy

ostium

[′äs·tē·əm]
(biology)
A mouth, entrance, or aperture.
References in periodicals archive ?
Including the Flash Ostial System in our portfolio allows AccessClosure to increase our level of service and education to healthcare providers.
Type B includes lesions identified by tubular shape, eccentricity, location in a moderate angulated segment, irregularity of contour, moderate or severe calcification, ostial location, total occlusions less than 3 months old, and presence of some thrombus.
Coronary ostial stenosis (may be associated with aortic stenosis)
Gary Brogan, VP of Regulatory and Clinical Affairs at Cappella, stated, "Up until now, physicians have been forced to treat the bifurcation with either two stents that weren't intended for this use, or one main vessel stent that has limitations in terms of ostial protection and sidebranch preservation.
CTA interpretation for atherosclerotic disease General * Normal arterial anatomy * Anomalous and normal variant arterial anatomy * Arterial caliber * Arterial course Atherosclerotic plaque * Extent of disease * minimal * mild * moderate * extensive * Location * ostial * post-ostial * mid segment * distal segment * Composition * non-calcified * calcified * mixed * Segmental descriptors * homogeneous * heterogeneous * Ulceration * non-penetrating * penetrating Lumen * Patent * Percent stenosis * <30% * 30-50% * 51-70% * >70% Co-morbid disease * Aneurysms * Dissection * Intramural hematoma * Organ ischemia * Organ infarction
On July 31, 2010, the aortic valve (bioprosthesis) and proximal portion of the ascending aorta were replaced (the latter was a homograft), the paravalvular abscess was debrided, and the coronary ostial sites were implanted into the homograft.
This case demonstrates that ostial polys in the maxillary sinus can cause recurring maxillary sinus disease by obstructing the ethmoid infundibulum and natural ostium of the maxillary sinus.
Coronary involvement, although rare, is often ostial and causes ischemia due to inflammatory stenosis.
5a, close-up of ostial part; 5b, close-up of uncus and juxta; 5c, abdominal segments.
3 Billion 161Table 90: CardioNet Acquries Provider Of Cardiac Monitoring Services, ECG Scanning & Medical Services 163Table 91: Merit Medical Systems Acquires Ostial Solutions 164Table 92: AngioDynamics Acquires Navilyst Medical From Avista Capital For $355 Million 165Table 93: Terumo Acquires An Innovative Sheath Technology Company, Onset Medical 167Table 94: Mediplast Acquires Innova Medical, Ventricular Assist Device Distributor 168Table 95: C.
About 8% of patients had ostial lesions, another 8% had lesions at bifurcations, 35% had calcified lesions, 37% had lesions of moderate or excessive tortuosity, and 2% of lesions were in saphenous vein grafts.