ostinato

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Related to ostinatos: Basso ostinato, Ostinati

ostinato:

see ground bassground bass,
melodic phrase used repeatedly as a bass line. In its earlier form, developed in the 13th and 14th cent., the ground or basso ostinato [Ital.,=obstinate] never varied in harmonization or pitch. The tenor, or pes, of Sumer Is Icumen In is such a ground.
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ostinato

a. a continuously reiterated musical phrase
b. (as modifier): an ostinato passage
References in periodicals archive ?
The application of motor "mechanical" rhythm, as well as "mechanically" progressing ostinato figures, then serves to enhance this effect.
2) The two phrases Torke describes consist of interwoven ostinatos that evolve in a quiet and intriguing way.
9 and 10, respectively), Murchison reveals how Copland largely adapted his earlier compositional techniques such as ostinatos, pedals, polyrhythmic complexities, and bitonality into a more accessible idiom, while simultaneously pulling from Stravinsky's use of segmented folk tunes.
He identifies and provides examples from her music of several of her approaches: ostinato, retrograde, rotation, and unique arrangements
The end result, throughout the Quintette, is music that is uniformly lyrical in its phrasing, but rather less so in its melodies; there is little counterpoint, but the harmonies are frequently acerbic; much use is made of ostinatos, and the texture is often thick.
Some common elements in all the performances were multiple percussionists (this being Africa, after all), and an aural fabric of ostinatos, usually played by one or more electric guitars.
Similarly, a wide variety of musical devices are described as deriving from Moravian folk music, including "frequent ostinatos and rhythmic irregularities, such as asymmetrical phrase lengths" (p.
These harps are suited to performing one or several lines in a matrix of ostinatos, while the minstrel banjo, like its direct modern issue, the five-string banjo of twentieth-century southeastern string bands, is designed for a very different texture, the combination of a melody (itself performed in heterophony with a fiddle and perhaps a voice) with a drone.
Despite the differentiation of character between the two parts, the cello assumes the dominant role, being assigned the primary thematic ideas, while the piano material is usually limited to the aforementioned ostinatos.
The whole movement is built around pedal notes and ostinatos consisting of open fifths or tritones that accompany short legato melodies.
From in-depth analysis of pertinent examples emerge recurring stylistic traits, such as semitonal relations, third- and seventh-degree inflection, octatonic activity, tritonal polarity, sequentially 'treated second-inversion chords, altered Mixolydian mode (with flattened sixth) in addition to traditional modes, and multiple ostinatos that cut across individual phrases.
The melody is propelled forward by connecting sustained notes with fleeting sextuplets and ostinatos of staccato thirty-second notes.