other-directedness


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other-directedness

an attitudinal orientation or personality type in which a person's sense of social identity is dependent upon the approval of others. In the two-fold schema proposed by RIESMAN (1950), other-directedness is contrasted with inner-directedness, in which a person's behaviour and sense of social identity is mainly governed by internalized standards and conscience. Riesman's suggestion was that modern societies like the US, dominated by mass consumption, were increasingly moving towards other-direction and an anxiety-riven conformity; a fear of not fitting in (other-direction), rather than a deeper sense of‘guilt‘ or 'shame’ (inner-direction).
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
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Her other-directedness and ontological instability are emphasized throughout the novel, most of all during her flirtations with Arthur Russell, her quasi-suitor.
As Ho (1994) also observed, face "is a powerful mechanism underlying other-directedness, that is, acting in ways that reflect a high degree of sensitivity for how one's actions are perceived and reacted to by others" (p.
Given the theoretical considerations and previous findings, it was hypothesized that individuals who report childhood traumatic experiences would show increased evidence of maladaptive schemas, particularly interpersonal themes such as the Disconnection and Rejection, Impaired Autonomy and Performance and Other-directedness schema domains.
The first one (G-Factor Only Model) consisted of one latent factor labeled "Self-Monitoring", the second one (Correlated-Factors Model) consisted of two correlated factors labeled "Public Performance" and "Other-Directedness", and the third one (BiFactor Model), specified that each item loads onto a g-factor as well as another specific s-factor (i.e., Either "Public Performance" or "Other-Directedness").
This scale consists of 25 items composed in a true / false format comprising 3 subscales: 1) other-directedness, 2) extraversion, and 3) ability to act or acting.
It is such love or other-directedness that will allow the subject to respect one's own experience and the unique experiences of others but at the same time will not see this individuality as disruptive of unity.
Richter points out that music, for Bloch, is the prime sphere in which we encounter the general other-directedness of signification.
In 1980, Riesman detected a change to other-directedness, which compels people to listen to an outside radar, to base their decisions (and values or tastes) on those of others.
Thus, an authentic Christianity in the contemporary United States involves an ethic of "other-directedness," in which we are, like the Good Samaritan, charged to help one another.
To be noted, again, is the other-directedness: "being in love" hardly merited consideration (although, as we shall see, they had a term for a kind of proto-jealousy).
used a two-factor model of self-monitoring: public performance and other-directedness. Self-esteem is the evaluation of one's personal characteristics and attributes.