Placode

(redirected from otic placode)
Also found in: Medical.

placode

[′pla‚kōd]
(embryology)
A platelike epithelial thickening, frequently marking, in the embryo, the anlage of an organ or part.

Placode

 

the rudiment of a sense organ or ganglion in humans, vertebrates, and some invertebrates. Placodes are paired thickenings of the outermost embryonic germ layer, the ectoderm; they arise as the nervous system is laid down in the early stages of embryogeny. In vertebrates, placodes give rise to the olfactory organ, the crystalline lens of the eye, the inner ear, the auditory ganglion, and the ganglia of the facial, glossopharyngeal, and vagus nerves. In cyclostomes, fishes, and many amphibians, placodes give rise to the lateral-line organs in addition to the aforementioned structures.

References in periodicals archive ?
Our inner ear develops in the embryo from a simple flap of skin called the otic placode into a complex, three dimensional structure that enables balance and hearing.
The goal of the zebrafish research is to understand at the molecular level, how and why otic placode cells decide to become neuronal, non-sensory or sensory cells.
The main goal of the frog research is to determine which molecules and regions of the otic placode are required for normal patterning in the developing inner ear.