ototoxicity

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ototoxicity

[‚ō·tō·täk′sis·əd·ē]
(medicine)
Drug- or chemical-induced damage to the ear resulting in high-frequency hearing loss and tinnitus or disequilibrium.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
* Any past or present history of middle ear infection or on any ototoxic drugs.
Unfortunately, most ototoxic agents are important in medicine, and ototoxicity can develop even at therapeutic doses.
Tinnitus onset rates from chemotherapeutic agents and ototoxic antibiotics: Results of a large prospective study.
The other unique finding in this study is that the magnitudes of ototoxic effect were different for various tested pure-tone frequencies among workers exposed to toluene plus noise, noise only, and administrative clerks.
It is reported that, after ototoxic injury in guinea pigs, immature HCs were regenerated through regulating the ectopic expression of Atoh1, and the hearing function was rescued to a certain extent [21].
Among the 05 cases with Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE), only mild grade hearing impairment was recorded in 3 patients; 07 infants with ototoxic drug exposure 02 cases each of mild and moderate grade and 01 case each with severe and profound grade hearing impairment was recorded.
The ototoxic effect of toluene and the influence of noise, acetyl salicylic acid, or genotype.
Further in-vivo comparative studies are needed for understanding the mechanism of ototoxic effects of LIPO versus CDDP [22].
To verify the efficacy of the instrument system, an experiment was performed to measure the startle responses of zebrafish larvae to sound stimulus with different intensity in fish that were treated with or without ototoxic drug.
Variation in susceptibility to the development of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity has been attributed to age at initiation of treatment, renal dysfunction, cumulative cisplatin dosages, cranial irradiation, co-administration with other ototoxic drugs, noise exposure and genetic factors.
All patients fulfilled the International Study Group's diagnostic criteria for Behcet disease (2) Patients with a history of recurrent otitis, cranial trauma, ototoxic drug use, any condition related to inner ear damage, and any otologic or neurologic disease unrelated to Behcet disease were excluded from the study.
First, none of these studies controlled for other contributing factors for hearing loss differing between individuals with and without MS, such as noise exposure and use of ototoxic medications.