ototoxicity

(redirected from ototoxic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

ototoxicity

[‚ō·tō·täk′sis·əd·ē]
(medicine)
Drug- or chemical-induced damage to the ear resulting in high-frequency hearing loss and tinnitus or disequilibrium.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, hearing loss may not manifest until several weeks or months after completion of a course of an ototoxic drug.
The other unique finding in this study is that the magnitudes of ototoxic effect were different for various tested pure-tone frequencies among workers exposed to toluene plus noise, noise only, and administrative clerks.
Variation in susceptibility to the development of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity has been attributed to age at initiation of treatment, renal dysfunction, cumulative cisplatin dosages, cranial irradiation, co-administration with other ototoxic drugs, noise exposure and genetic factors.
Numerous studies indicate that DPOAE testing can reveal ototoxic changes before cochlear damage is detectable by conventional audiometry.
The purpose of the present investigation was to examine audiometric hearing status, while controlling for the potential confounding factors of age, sex, noise exposure, and use of ototoxic medications, in a large group of individuals with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) and secondary progressive MS (SPMS), and a control group of individuals without MS to answer the following questions: (1) Does audiometric hearing status differ between individuals with and without MS?
The ototoxic effect of toluene and the influence of noise, acetyl salicylic acid, or genotype.
Auditory system damage resulting from military activity can be caused by blast exposure, noise-induced damage from explosion or weapon firing (acoustic trauma), or ototoxic medications that are used during treatment of injuries and is frequently due to a combination of factors.
Hearing loss due to ototoxic medications such as chemotherapy, antibiotics or loop diuretics often results in permanent and progressive disability.
Smoking and ototoxic chemicals exposures are believed to cause hearing impairment (Barregard and Axelsson 1984; Morata et al.
Topical fluoroquinolone eardrops, commonly ofloxacin or ciprofloxacin, are known to be as effective as aminoglycoside drops, and have the advantage of not being ototoxic.
18) However, we remain cautious about using ototoxic drops when the eardrum is not intact.
Organic solvents, metals, and chemical asphyxiants are all known to have ototoxic potential [1-3].