otter trawl

otter trawl

[′äd·ər ‚trȯl]
(naval architecture)
A large commercial fishing trawl which uses kitelike wooden boards at the corners of the mouth of the net.
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En el buque Skimmer se utilizo una red de arrastre tipo otter trawl con malla de 3.6 cm en el cono final receptor de la captura.
Quantitative analysis of the behavior of longfin inshore squid (Doryteuthis pealeii) in reaction to a species separation grid of an otter trawl. Fish.
The current sampling gear consists of a 2-seam otter trawl with a 3.2-m headrope, 6.4-mm bar mesh with body netting of 210/6-size twine, and a tailbag made of 3.2-mm Delta-style knotless nylon and with a 150-mesh circumference and 450-mesh length.
The fishing gear used in this fishery was a single rockhopper otter trawl. The catch was sorted on deck through the use of a mechanical riddle consisting of fixed diameter steel rings and bars.
The following technical characteristics of the fishing equipment used by the fleet were considered for the purpose of drawing the respective designs: (1) material, diameter and length of the ropes; (2) material, chemical treatment, twine diameter, size and quantity of meshes in the upper and lower edges of the panels, fall and cutting rate (for each panel of the net); and (3) materials and arrangement of the gear rigging (length, diameter and weight of the warps and the bridles, sinkers, floaters and otter trawl doors, indicating the arrangement of the chains of the towing system).
A demersal species, it has yet to be taken in either of the four completed summer regional otter trawl surveys conducted by the Southern California Coastal Water Research Project (E.
Based on several tows in this area, investigators made the following observation: "Evidently huge beds of moulting females are mating with the males at this time of the year, and they are massed together in such a manner as to make them easy prey for a type of gear like the otter trawl, which scrapes along the bottom" (FWS, 1942: p.
The most widely used towed bottom-fishing gear is the otter trawl, whose forward motion spreads a pair of otter boards, each weighing tens to thousands of pounds, that hold the trawl mouth open.
Locally referred to as "draggers," these vessels use a form of mobile fishing gear known as the "otter trawl" a long, tapered net dragged on the ocean floor behind a vessel.