ottoman

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ottoman

a corded fabric

Ottoman

, Othman
1. History of or relating to the Ottomans or the Ottoman Empire
2. denoting or relating to the Turkish language
3. a member of a Turkish people who invaded the Near East in the late 13th century

ottoman

[′äd·ō·mən]
(textiles)
Heavyweight fabric with pronounced crosswise rounded ribs, often padded, with heavier ribs than those of faille or bengaline.
References in classic literature ?
She sits down on the ottoman gracefully in the place just left vacant by Higgins].
She sits down on the ottoman beside Eliza, devouring her with her eyes].
Is Eliza presentable [he swoops on his mother and drags her to the ottoman, where she sits down in Eliza's place with her son on her left]?
He seated himself--unforbidden this time-- on the ottoman by her side.
She said all this, and everything else, as coldly as a woman of snow; quite forgetting the sisters except at odd times, and apparently addressing some abstraction of Society; for whose behoof, too, she occasionally arranged her dress, or the composition of her figure upon the ottoman.
Part 1 provides a useful overview of the history of the Knights of Saint John from their expulsion from Rhodes by the Ottomans in 1522 to the Great Siege itself, including their settlement on the island of Malta from 1530 onwards.
By: Egypt Today staff CAIRO - 22 June 2017: Much like previous Muslim Empires, the Ottomans showed great toleration and acceptance of non-Muslim communities in their empire.
The Balkan Wars are among the harshest defeats the Ottomans ever experienced.
Second, the paper argues that the sixteenth-century outburst of frictions between Muslims and Christian rulers in Abyssinia and the later involvement of Portuguese and Ottomans in Abyssinia was primarily the result of a sore and unhealthy form of relationship between Muslims and Christian rulers in the past centuries in the country.
ySTANBUL (CyHAN)- Following the conquest of ystanbul in 1453, cultural exchange between the Ottomans and Europe increased and it is possible to see reflections of these relations in the works of many Renaissance artists.
Following the Ottoman decision to join the First World War on the side of the Central Powers, the British, French and Russians hatched a plan to finish the Ottomans off: an ambitious and unprecedented invasion of Gallipoli .
Furthermore, classically inspired humanist and theological writings, as well as Italian influences, derived from the latter's involvement in trade and conflict with the Ottomans, and shaped northern perceptions of the expanding Islamic Empire.