out


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out

1. Politics not in office or authority
2. Baseball an instance of the putting out of a batter; putout

out

A term used in air traffic control communications meaning the conversation is over and no further response is expected.
References in classic literature ?
One was that the chestnut trace horse, who had been unmistakably overworked on the previous day, was off his feed and out of sorts.
Of modern standers-of-mast-heads we have but a lifeless set; mere stone, iron, and bronze men; who, though well capable of facing out a stiff gale, are still entirely incompetent to the business of singing out upon discovering any strange sight.
I ventured to offer to the learned among them a conjecture of my own, that Laputa was QUASI LAP OUTED; LAP, signifying properly, the dancing of the sunbeams in the sea, and OUTED, a wing; which, however, I shall not obtrude, but submit to the judicious reader.
They went boating on the harbor and up the three pretty rivers that flowed into it; they had clambakes on the bar and mussel-bakes on the rocks; they picked strawberries on the sand-dunes; they went out cod-fishing with Captain Jim; they shot plover in the shore fields and wild ducks in the cove--at least, the men did.
When Anderson first introduced me to his family, about two years ago, his sister was not out, and I could not get her to speak to me.
Could any crueler slur than this have been cast on a woman at the outs et of her married life, before the face of her husband, and in the presence of two strangers from another country?
She was not a convert, nor was her aunt who sat on the other side of her, and who, visiting from the country where at that time the Salvation Army was not, had dropped in to the meeting for half an hour out of curiosity.
He always looked in for five minutes, smiled at the girls and handed out real perfectos to the delighted boys.
My friend threw out the information in a very offhand way, but I saw that he cocked his eye at me to see if I had followed his reasoning.
The theft raid which he had made upon the village turned out better than he had ventured to hope.
Clad in a simple gown, and perhaps with bare feet, the pilgrim set out. Carrying a staff in his hand, and begging for food and shelter by the road, he took his way to the shrine of some saint.
On rainy or melancholy days Edna went out and sought the society of the friends she had made at Grand Isle.