out

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Related to out-of-pocket: Out-of-pocket expenses

out

1. Politics not in office or authority
2. Baseball an instance of the putting out of a batter; putout
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

out

A term used in air traffic control communications meaning the conversation is over and no further response is expected.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
The rising out-of-pocket health expenditures all over the globe are a cause of worry for all the policy makers and economists.
...In 2013, Medicare covered 62% of the cost of health care services for Medicare beneficiaries ages 65 and older, while out-of-pocket spending accounted for 13%, and private insurance covered 13%."
"Patients with the highest out-of-pocket costs were less likely to fill their prescriptions and had a shorter duration of treatment," said Agarwal, who was not involved in the study.
(12) While there have been studies of the changes in out-of-pocket medical spending and income, (12-14) the effects of these changes on the estimated prevalence and distribution of high medical financial burdens have not been investigated.
The quality health service pillar is a value for health which should improve the wellness of health seekers, and financial risk protection is geared towards minimising any out-of-pocket expenditure to safeguard the financial status of citizens.
Because Medicare beneficiary cost-sharing is directly related to the Medicare payment rate for the drug and the administration of the drug, this provision will have an immediate impact on out-of-pocket costs for seniors.
Over that time period, both total and out-of-pocket costs were considerably and consistently higher for those aged 65 years and older than for those under 65.
It focused on the financial hardships faced by the patients and their annual out-of-pocket expenditures of five years from 2011 to 2016.
Cancer survivors were identified as persons who responded affirmatively to the MEPS question "Have you ever been told by a doctor or other health professional that you had cancer or a malignancy of any kind?" Out-of-pocket spending was estimated in two ways: 1) annual out-of-pocket spending in 2016 dollars (https://www.bea.gov/) and 2) high annual out-of-pocket burden (defined as spending >20% of annual family income on medical care).
Capping out-of-pocket payments will reduce health care costs in the long run."
"Seventy-one percent of voters are more likely to support a congressional candidate who reduces out-of-pocket prescription drug costs by acting on pharmacists' recommendations," said NACDS president and chief executive officer Steve Anderson, citing data from a January survey conducted by Morning Consult.