out

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out

1. Politics not in office or authority
2. Baseball an instance of the putting out of a batter; putout

out

A term used in air traffic control communications meaning the conversation is over and no further response is expected.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, Anthem will reimburse approximately 50,000 impacted consumers who paid more out-of-pocket due to the 2011 mid-year changes a total of nearly $8.
Our findings suggest the ACA mandate will likely significantly reduce the out-of-pocket expenditures of contraceptive users, in some cases to nothing," Nora Becker and Daniel Polsky, Ph.
Deciding on a metal level is the first step in understanding which plan may be right for you You also will want to understand how your plan's benefits are designed so that you strike the balance between coverage that meets your health care needs and the amount you are willing to pay in premiums and out-of-pocket costs All plans within a single metal level are not the same, and depending on your particular health needs and the prescription medications you take, the amount you pay out-of-pocket each year could vary significantly within the same metal level See the Key Components of Plan Selection section for a guide to choosing among plans in a given level of coverage.
If a physician accepts out-of-pocket payment from Medicare patients who want to pay, for example, for extra time with their doctor during a Medicare-covered visit, the physician is forced from the Medicare program for two years.
Women's out-of-pocket costs were more than $200 greater than men's out-of-pocket costs, $883 per capita for women compared to $647 for men.
The Avalere report also found that a beneficiary's out-of-pocket costs for a prescribed medication ranged from as little as $1 for a preferred generic drug to as much as $95 for a non-preferred brand medication, or 45% of the drug's cost.
Critical illness insurance (CI) may be a solid solution to meet this emerging need for protection against increasing out-of-pocket medical costs and related expenses in the event of a serious illness.
Analyzing hospital spending, use, prices and out-of-pocket payments for mental health and substance use admissions for people younger than 65, the report found that between 2007 and 2011, spending on hospital admissions for mental health and substance use grew faster than spending on medical and surgical admissions.
Large group plans were also required to make copays, deductibles, coinsurance, and out-of-pocket maximums for behavioral healthcare equivalent with the most common medical/surgical treatments.
Under another option, employees willing to pay higher monthly premiums could have a deductible of $300 and a maximum out-of-pocket expense of $1,200.
For such beneficiaries who use a given specialty tier-eligible drug, different cost-sharing structures result in varying out-of-pocket costs only until they reach the catastrophic coverage threshold, which 31 percent of these beneficiaries did in 2007.