outbreeding

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outbreeding

[′au̇t‚brēd·iŋ]
(genetics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Outcrossing rate MLEs for individual families were highly variable, ranging from 0.5 to 1.0 in the parental-like groups and from 0.42-1.00 in the hybrid fraction of each hybrid zone [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 2 OMITTED].
Outcrossing results from these hybrids gave an empirical measure of flowering synchrony with the source, and provided a baseline of outcrossing at very short distance.
If seeds within fruits are indeed the products of self-pollination, the relatedness of seeds within fruits should have an outcrossing rate (t) close to zero, and the undispersed seedling aggregations around the maternal plant should be related as full siblings.
A test for proximity dependent outcrossing in the alpine skypilot, Polemonium viscosum.
The authors are not aware of any outcrossing studies for cotton in California, where both the environment and the varieties differ from those in the southeastern USA.
Natural selection may therefore favor selfing over outcrossing under some conditions.
To determine the effects of herbivory on the mating structure of this population, we compared outcrossing rates between 23 protected and 23 exposed plants.
In this case, the self progeny can be the result of either a maternal plant derived from selfing or from outcrossing. Only in the former case is the maternal component expressed.
Wheat is classified as an inbreeding species; however, low rates of outcrossing (usually less than 2%) can occur via wind-borne pollen (Lersten, 1987; Poehlman and Sleper, 1995).
Because isozyme studies have shown that the Virginia sites predominantly outcross (over 85% of their seeds on average, with as much as 95% outcrossing in some years; M.
This association can allow selfing variants to invade an outcrossing population even if population-level inbreeding depression is high enough to counteract the transmission advantage inherent to selfing (Fisher 1941).