outer planets


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

outer planets

The planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto, which lie farther from the Sun than the main asteroid belt. With the exception of Pluto, all are giant planets.

outer planets

[′au̇d·ər ′plan·əts]
(astronomy)
The planets with orbits larger than that of Mars: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto.
References in periodicals archive ?
While our results suggest that the outer planets are the best candidates to search for water with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope, they also highlight the need for theoretical studies and complementary observations at all wavelengths to determine the nature of the TRAPPIST-1 planets and their potential habitability," concludes Bourrier.
Your ruling planet Saturn is not the slowest of the outer planets which orbits our solar system.
Pioneer 10 and the Voyager probes have toured the outer planets, sending back a wealth of images and data.
In a move toward exploration of the outer planets, scientists are working on building lighter, smaller probes.
We're 500 years in the future, following a war in a newly colonized solar system that was won by a coalition called the Alliance; the losers, the Independents, roam the outer planets like frontier cowboys, along with the Reavers, thugs who eat their enemies live.
Sharing space science knowledge is part of what NASA's job is,'' said Richard Shope, education and public outreach coordinator for JPL's Outer Planets Program.
The moon's ample supply of helium-3, long touted by space buffs as a potential fuel for advanced fusion reactors, is duly noted, as are the even larger supplies of the substance in the atmospheres of all of the giant outer planets.
The sun's influence extends far beyond the orbits of the outer planets and the vast reservoir of periodic comets known as the Kuiper Belt because the solar wind fills the heliosphere and exerts an outward pressure on the interstellar medium.
Uranus changes in color and brightness to the same rhythm as the solar cycle, showing how far the sun's influence extends into space even if there isn't much heat reaching the outer planets.
But the system's outer planets - including the three in the habitable zone - may have lost less than three Earth-oceans worth of water.
The moon is about 1 percent the mass of Earth, while the combined mass of all the moons of the outer planets is no more than one tenth of one percent of their parent planets.
Targets will range from the solar systems outer planets (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune) and icy Kuiper Belt to exoplanets to distant galaxies in the young universe.