overbuilder

overbuilder

(1) A communications company that enters an area already served by existing providers.

(2) A communications company that strings its network on the same poles used by the telephone and cable companies. See over-the-top broadcasting.
References in periodicals archive ?
from an overbuilder theory of liability--x; but plaintiffs' damages
at 1434 ("[T]he model assumed the validity of all four theories of antitrust impact initially advanced by respondents: decreased penetration by satellite providers, overbuilder deterrence, lack of benchmark competition, and increased bargaining power.
As an overbuilder in a fast-growing market, it is critical that we are more nimble and deliver a superior service experience relative to our competition.
The expert who designed the regression model acknowledged that it did not isolate damages resulting only from the overbuilder theory but instead included damages attributable to all four theories of antitrust impact, three of which the court had rejected.
That does not happen because the overbuilder has no incentive to rock
If we didn't build it, the cable company might, or some overbuilder.
The FCC especially noted (1) cases brought by DIRECTV and EchoStar (now DISH Network) against Comcast and (2) a case brought by overbuilder RCN against Cablevision.
The first such law, adopted in Florida in 1987, was in direct response to the emergence of Telesat Cablevision, an aggressive overbuilder that had entered over a dozen Florida markets, lowering cable prices and profits.
percent lower in geographic markets with a wireline overbuilder than in
At home, depending upon their geographic location, consumers eventually may be able to pick and choose among a telephone company, a cable company, an overbuilder, several wireless companies, satellite companies, a broadband over powerline company, and municipal and other Wi-Fi or Wi-Max providers.