overdesign


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overdesign

As applied to structural design, a design based on requirements higher than service demands, usually as a means of compensating for unknown and/or anticipated deficiencies.
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast to the predecessor version, National Ready Mixed Concrete Association Engineering staff notes, ASTM C94-15 places the onus on the customer to communicate all requirements for concrete from a project specification; sets mix air content at levels for moderate and severe exposure; directs the purchaser, when ordering ready mixed, to either state the required air content or indicate finished concrete exposure type; requires purchaser to indicate density when ordering heavy weight mixes, and clarifies terms for ordering lightweight aggregate by stating equilibrium density; and, contains appendix revisions advising on strength overdesign concepts.
It is easier to overdesign, then whittle down to meet code.
2] has the potential to reduce uncertainty and avoid unnecessary overdesign of the pipelines.
X-pessimism leads to wasted debug effort and overdesign.
These deviations usually cause an overdesign of the building structures, which ACCIONA Infrastructure is striving to avoid.
However, the trade-off would be overdesign, within an acceptable limit.
Common techniques for planning for requirements changes include overdesign (as in the example above), delayed implementation and bread boarding high-risk systems.
This will result in over-estimation of the thermal conditions, which will lead to overdesign of the thermal environments and the mechanical systems.
Among the strategies evaluated, the two that reduced embodied emissions--increased fly ash and reduced overdesign due to better designs--were found to lower the CO2 emissions by approximately 10% and 17%, respectively, while also saving upfront costs.
Three key factors: 1) overdesign, 2) lack of technical expertise at the overseeing transit agency, and 3) external factors like political interference and rising material costs.
Diligent design: In the past, architects and design professionals often tended to overdesign to provide a layer of protection in the case of system or material failure.