overdraft

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overdraft

[′ō·vər‚draft]
(metallurgy)
Upward curving of a piece of metal after leaving the rolls during forming, due to higher speed of the lower roll.
References in periodicals archive ?
They were also informed that if they did not choose to opt in for overdraft protection, their transactions could be denied if their account was overdrawn.
51 If your overdrawn check is returned $48 If you borrow $300 from a Pay Day Lender $35 If your overdrawn check is paid by a Wall St.
They keep sending me letters saying they're charging me for being overdrawn and it wasn't my fault.
The same proportion of young people also admit they are permanently overdrawn, double the 11 per cent of people across all age groups who never get back into the black.
But even careful consumers may find their accounts overdrawn from time to time and may take advantage of the "courtesy" overdraft or bounce protection plans that many banks offer.
We have to forgive a tame effort at Epsom last time, but that switchback track does not suit every horse and Overdrawn has shown all his best form on flat courses, including three good runs in nurseries at Doncaster last year.
Lilian, who is a senior shop steward for Unison, said she has become overdrawn at the bank as a result of not being paid the money which she is owed.
Other features include overdrawn account warnings, memorized transactions, fast data entry with quickfihl, account balances at a glance, and the ability to record split transactions.
By carefully charting the activities of mainline black churches and identifying the rise of urban Pentecostalism with a vibrant black rural culture, Sernett exposes the limits of this overdrawn instrumentalist view of black religious history.
One firm became overdrawn at the bank because a pounds 7,000 cheque took 10 days to arrive.
But with the help of a wishy-washy judge and grandstanding lawyers, the overdrawn case became a media circus with gavel-to-gavel radio coverage and every-evening wrap-ups by legal pundits on television.
By adopting wholesale arguments that have been criticized as overdrawn (from Elizabeth Eisenstein on printing, to Keith Hutchinson on occult qualities during the scientific revolution, or Lawrence Stone on the decline of the aristocracy), his picture of the transition from medieval to modern is sharp and clear rather than complicated and fine-grained.