overfalls


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overfalls

[′ō·vər‚fȯlz]
(oceanography)
Short, breaking waves occurring when a strong current passes over a shoal or other submarine obstruction or meets a contrary current or wind.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This violent stretch of water, with its chaotic overfalls, sea surges and big whirlpools, is seen as one of the best tidal resources on earth.
His poem "Dwelling," for instance, ends with: "In the clammy ear of a mollusc oceans swell; / Grit that sands and pearls our chosen shell." Metaphorically reflecting in "Watch" on his three decades of marriage, he considers "Chartered years of bell-shaped lead-lines, / Riptides, overfalls, height and shallow, / So much unfathomed." He develops in Love Life the classic triad of truth, beauty, and goodness; he brings together heart and mind; and he celebrates the paradox of freedom and control: "Already we've become the dance; bodies and minds / A sweated ecstasy, a pulsing frenzy of control" ("Summerfest").
In the vicinity of Singapore the tidal streams can attain rates of some 6 knots with associated eddies and overfalls. These strong tidal streams cause large uniform sandwaves on the seabed, which form at right angles to the water flow and can vary in height from 13 to 23 feet.
In an 18ft Drascombe lugger, the overfalls off the Great Orme and the Gower seemed a bit larger in proportion and our landfall at Rhyl harbour in the dark, I shall never forget!