incontinence

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incontinence

[in′känt·ən·əns]
(medicine)
Inability to control the natural evacuations, as the feces or the urine; specifically, involuntary evacuation from organic causes.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Overflow incontinence, which is the feeling that the bladder is always full, accompanied by dribbling of urine, is rare in women.
Importantly, reductions in encopresis were also associated with increases in the frequency of bowel movements, which is consistent with the assumption that encopresis is a function of constipation and overflow incontinence.
This technology is a noninvasive way to repeatedly assess patients who have or are at risk lot urinary retention and overflow incontinence. This includes patients who have weak detrusor muscle contractions resulting from diabetes, Parkinson disease and spinal cord injuries or who take medications that interfere with bladder emptying.
Overflow incontinence refers to leakage that occurs when the quantity of urine produced exceeds the bladder's holding capacity.
That's when you've found that one overflow incontinence patient who you don't want to operate on," he said.
* Overflow incontinence, an inability to empty the bladder properly, which can cause frequent or constant dribbling of urine.
If your bladder is always full so that it continually leaks urine, you have overflow incontinence. Weak bladder muscles or a blocked urethra can cause this type of incontinence.
Overflow incontinence occurs when the bladder is allowed to become so full that it simply overflows; people with this type may feel that they never completely empty their bladder.
Stool impaction Patients with stool Disimpaction impaction present with restores continence either urge or in most instances overflow incontinence. if this was the Stool impaction may cause.
The remaining 39 patients formed a heterogeneous reference group with genuine stress incontinence (5/39), incontinence of mixed or questionable type (7/39), overflow incontinence (1/39) or no objective leakage on video-urodynamics (with or without detrusor instability) (26/39).
Types include stress incontinence (characterized by loss of urine while exercising or moving in a certain way); urge incontinence (urine loss when a strong urge to go to the bathroom is felt); overflow incontinence (individual has a feeling that the bladder is never completely emptied); and neurogenic incontinence (a result of head or brain trauma, spinal cord damage, back injury, or spina bidifa).
* Overflow incontinence is more common in men, and is typically caused by prostatic disease.