overland flow


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Related to overland flow: Surface runoff

overland flow

[′ō·vər·lənd ′flō]
(hydrology)
Water flowing over the ground surface toward a channel; upon reaching the channel, it is called surface runoff. Also known as surface flow.
References in periodicals archive ?
Field observations during our experiment have also shown the importance of tree litter for slowing and dispersing overland flow, and therefore for increasing the opportunity for infiltration.
It typically highlighted broad areas of overland flow accumulation that are topographical located between glaciated uplands and sites of natural channel incision.
The overland flow from each plot was collected, via a hose connected to the frame, into a 20-L bucket.
45 [micro]m) as an estimate for P in overland flow (McDowell and Condron 2004), and bicarbonate-extractable P (Olsen P; Olsen et al.
For modeling purposes, extraction coefficients can be determined as the slope of the linear regression of STP and overland flow dissolved P (Figure 1a).
In practice, removing cows onto a stand-off pad, feed pad, or confined area of paddock should be worthwhile during sustained wet periods to lessen soil physical damage over the farm and to lessen the risk of overland flow.
2] extracts (0-2 inch depth), overland flow, or sub-surface drainage water (McDowell and Sharpley, 2001; Hesketh and Brookes, 2000; McDowell et al.
However, our findings show that overland flow contributed very little to survival, growth, reproduction, and ecophysiology of these trees.
In conventional dairy systems, losses through overland flow may occur due to fertilizer amendment to fields and grassland pastures.
It has been demonstrated that increases in slope length and slope steepness can produce higher overland flow velocities and correspondingly higher erosion (Haan et al.
fully distributed (KINEROS divides watersheds up into a series of channel elements and overland flow planes, and hsB-SM runs on a 0.
This was achieved by: * Overland flow interception, which involves the creation of a bund - a soil, wood or stone barrier - across a flow path to create storage, usually in fields and open land.