overland flow


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Related to overland flow: Surface runoff

overland flow

[′ō·vər·lənd ′flō]
(hydrology)
Water flowing over the ground surface toward a channel; upon reaching the channel, it is called surface runoff. Also known as surface flow.
References in periodicals archive ?
Effects of overland flow on plant water relations, erosion, and soil water percolation on a Mojave Desert landscape.
This slope angle also corresponds to the direction of overland flow from the cell in question (Quinn et al.
In KINEROS/hsB-SM, runoff generation can occur either as infiltration excess overland flow (when the rainfall rate overcomes the infiltration capacity of soils), leading to Horton overland flow, or from saturation excess, which usually occurs next to streams and can arise when the water table rises to the surface because of rapid infiltration in place and/or rapid movement of water downhill from upslope areas.
All other factors being equal, it has been established that erosion rates increase as slope angles increase; presumably as overland flow velocities increase, so does the erosive power and transport capacity of runoff to carry suspended sediments.
Influence of Moving Rainstorms on Overland Flow of an Open Book Type Using Kinematic Wave.
McDowell RW, Sharpley AN (2002) Phosphorus transport in overland flow in response to position of manure application.
and TON being exported to streams primarily as overland flow and/or preferential flow to tile drains through soil macropores.
max], the excess water gives rise to overland flow as to infiltration.
Sediment sources within fluvial systems include overland flow from the surrounding landscape, bank erosion, and sediments that are resuspended from the channel bottom.
The flooding of homes and businesses in towns and cities is typically due to a range of factors, including high river levels, concentrations of overland flow following heavy rainfall, limited capacity of drainage systems and blockage of waterways and drainage channels
Slopewash, a combination of rainsplash and overland flow erosion, is one of the principal soil erosion processes in rainforest areas.