Overload

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overload

[′ō·vər‚lōd]
(civil engineering)
A load on a structure that is greater than that for which the structure was designed.
(electronics)
A load greater than that which a device is designed to handle; may cause overheating of power-handling components and distortion in signal circuits.
(geology)
The amount of sediment that exceeds the ability of a stream to transport it and is therefore deposited.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Overload

In electricity, more than a normal amount of electric current flowing through a device or machine, or a load greater than the device is designed to carry.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

overload

1. A load on a structure in excess of that for which it was designed.
2. Electric current, power, or voltage in excess of that for which a device or circuit was designed.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

information overload

A symptom of the high-tech age, which is too much information for one person to absorb in a world of expanding digital technology. Information overload primarily comes from the gigantic amount of content on the Internet, including search engine results, blogs and social media. Web pages bombard the senses with ads, and junk email (spam) adds chaos. Combine the digital information with the traditional sources such as TV, magazines, newsletters and junk postal mail, and information overload is a fact of modern life in the developed world. See Data Smog, disinformation and digital vacation.

The Help Manuals Make It Worse
Information overload also includes the often indecipherable documentation that must be read to operate everything from a handheld device to a software application. It boils down to this: the volume of information that crossed our brains in one week at the end of the 20th century is more than a person received in a lifetime at the beginning of it. See user interface and RTFM.

overloading

In programming, the ability to use the same variable for different data types. For example, the variable result could be initially filled (loaded) with a pointer and then with a string of data. See variable.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
'Whenever our grid appears to be overloaded, we shut the feeders to save the system.
The mill quickly added new separators and low-NPSH removal pumps to handle the greatly increased water flows from the felts; this solved the overload and trip-outs.
LIS literature, along with writing that circulates in popular culture, also shows how the concept of information overload functions as a modern-day myth that shapes comprehension and coping strategies in an era when information--whether as definitive of society, or as society's chief economic product--has taken center stage.
Viewing information overload as myth validates its existence without requiring proof.
This discussion includes various views of myth(2) and its relationship to folkloristics in order to extract the nuance of meaning each offers for a description of the mythology of information overload.
The following discussions of the force and character of the information society, the nature of information, and the problem of overload suggest that information overload can be thought of as a myth developed in response to an overwhelming social process.
When faced with repeated annoying overloads, it's tempting to replace a fuse or circuit breaker with a higher-rated one, for example, replacing a 15-amp fuse with a 20-amp so it won't burn out as easily.
While overloads can occur in any circuit, the ones that serve the kitchen account for most of them.
It's not surprising that the rising electrical demand often exceeded the capacity of the older wiring, and overloads were common.
Other heavy-draw appliances like portable electric heaters, clothes irons, hair dryers and air conditioners often cause overloads too.
Maintenance and inspection safety has been improved by employing a finger protection mechanism to cover exposed terminals (conforms to DIN 57106) and the tripped status of the overload relay can be visually checked.
* Fuji TK26E overload relays are $25.00, have a 1-year warranty