overt infection

overt infection

[‚ō·vərt in′fek·shən]
(medicine)
A host-parasite interaction that results in some injury to the tissues of the host.
References in periodicals archive ?
There was also no significant difference in weight gain by larvae of the unexposed and exposed surviving that were exposed but did not get overt infection (polyhedrosis).
And get immunized against this season's flu strains--as you know it's not perfect, but it represents the best possible probability of either preventing an overt infection with the virus, or of reducing its severity should you contract a similar strain.
However, development of chorioamnionitis or overt infection of the amniotic cavity is associated with high maternal morbidity and sometimes maternal death.
In general, there is normal development in the first year without overt infection. However, there have been case reports of infections with varicella or upper respiratory infections in infants exposed to infliximab before 30 weeks' gestation.
When these results were stratified according to occult or overt infection, results show that the HBV reactivation for patients with occult infection was 2.6% (95% CI: 0.4-6.6%, [I.sup.2]: 59.2%), compared with 10.7% (95% CI: 1.4-50.2%, [I.sup.2]:88.8%) among patients with overt chronic infection (Table 3).
Clinical relevance of positive breast periprosthetic cultures without overt infection. Plast Reconstr Surg 1995;96(5):1125-9.
Probably related to the phenomenon of bacterial colonization rather than overt infection and also most likely due to way of implant insertion into the bone, that is, the introduction into the metaphysis while leaving the bone marrow intact, the radiological examination was uneventful for any of the tested animals.
Fourteen days post overt infection (dpi), the rChIFN-[alpha]-water was replaced with plain water for the remaining 14 days of the study.
Another potential interpretation of these rules is that hsCRP should be used in conditions other than cardiovascular disease, where overt infection or inflammation is absent, whereas cCRP should be used in risk assessment of heart disease.
Such transmission might not be apparent in dialysis centers because it occurs less frequently than in acute care hospitals, it results in undetected colonization rather than overt infection, or because dialysis patients are frequently hospitalized and it is difficult to determine whether transmission occurred in the inpatient or outpatient setting.
We have identified several factors that may have contributed to this resurgence: lowered herd immunity, increasing virus transmission outside the home, more clinically overt infection as a consequence of adult infection, and a shift in the surveillance emphasis of the vector control program.
In the case of the South Africans infected predominantly with subgenotype A1, the HBsAg-covert infections did not differ from overt infections in terms of viral load.