overwash


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overwash

[′ō·vər‚wäsh]
(geology)
A mass of water representing the part of the wave advancing up a beach that runs over the highest part of the berm (or other structure) and that does not flow directly back to the sea or lake.
References in periodicals archive ?
Approximately 60 percent of North Carolina dunes are expected to be impacted by dune erosion, with 5 percent of that stretch of coastline expected to experience overwash.
Instead of overwash lobes and channels, a spit platform with simple ridges at the southern end of Winameg ridge records a short-lived lake level.
Nourishment designs that preserve the vertical beach profile (the beach slope), dunes, and overwash areas important to nesting and brood foraging habitats may be necessary for the long-term conservation of shorebirds.
To whatever end, these people triumph, as resilient as their island, "the crust of a continent defying the overwash and daring a wind to take it away."
Above all, overwash and onshore-offshore sediment transport are the possible mechanisms that control the drifting of sand.
Geological Survey, "Barrier-Island Inundation and Overwash: Application to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill," June 15, 2010, http://www.usgs.gov/deepwater_horizon/scenario/.
Storm-surge and overwash events here often erode dunes entirely and can lead to inlet formation (McCaffrey and Dueser, 1990).
Morphology Elevation Plan View Cross-shore Sedimentology (m) Unit A 0-1 Continuous 1.5 to 2 m Poorly sorted, barriers, spit high, 20 to 60 angular to recurves and m wide sub-angular overwash fans barriers.
Al incrementarse la intensidad del huracan se llega al nivel 3, o de regimen de overwash, donde se modifica drasticamente la morfologia costera, destruyendo o trasladando la duna y originando canales de tormenta (ebb channels) y depositos de washover en distintas modalidades (lenguetas, terrazas, abanicos).
The result of that limitation is a narrow barrier and a very restricted flood-tide delta and overwash contribution as the barrier was extending southward.
Deposition of recurved spits leads to sets of concordant beach ridges that are convex towards the sea while erosion and overwash produce long, narrow march hammocks that are concave to the sea and truncate older structures This pattern extends about 3.5 miles north to a distinctive erosional lineament, called Zapala scarp, that marks the former limit of Sapelo Sound.
Under natural conditions, many barriers migrate landwards by overwash during storms, unless they receive sufficient sediment to counteract the Holocene sea -level rise and this movement has accelerated in recent years (Fig.6a).