overwrite

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overwrite

[¦ō·vər¦rīt]
(computer science)
To enter information into a storage location and destroy the information previously held there.

overwrite

To record new data on top of existing data in a rewritable medium such as main memory, magnetic disk or rewritable optical disks. See direct overwrite.
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, the phrasing "absorbing and revisiting the soul of the place - and the unseen souls who still trudge through here" is classic, mawkish overwriting and should be cut.
And overwriting the final file using a security program will not eliminate the previous copies of the document.
In our conversations with advisors, we have consistently heard that they are looking to provide clients with a call overwriting strategy to support long-term wealth creation while managing overall portfolio volatility," said Phill Rogerson, managing director of Consulting and Product Development for Russell's U.
With the introduction of a strict SBP policy in 2000, all currency notes bearing overwriting on Quaid-e-Azam's image were dubbed as illegal and unacceptable.
This results in multiple initiators overwriting each other's data, which is never a good thing in a SAN.
Read-only access to archived data eliminates worries about overwriting data.
Disk erasures are performed by overwriting stored data to make it unrecoverable.
This is based on David Shelton's proxy integration approach and David Li's concept of overwriting a copula-modelled loss distribution with one implied from the tranche market.
These include network and local authentication; HDD overwriting and encryption; PDF encryption and compression; IP filtering and secure watermark.
For additional peace of mind, a Secure Erase feature completely removes documents from the hard drive by overwriting the encrypted data.
A secure disk erasure is actually performed by overwriting sufficiently to make any original data unrecoverable.
For example, sanctions against Morgan Stanley for its failure to stop the overwriting of emails and to timely produce emails led recently to a $1.