oxalosis


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oxalosis

[¦ak·sə¦lō·səs]
(medicine)
A rare hereditary metabolic disorder, inherited as an autosomal recessive, in which glyoxylic acid metabolism is impaired, resulting in overproduction of oxalic acid and deposition of calcium oxalate in body tissues.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Presented additional data from PHYOX1 study in patients with PH1 and PH type 2 showing substantial reduction in urinary oxalate following single-dose administration of DCR-PHXC at the Oxalosis and Hyperoxaluria Foundation International Hyperoxaluria Workshop.
The updated PHYOX1 data, presented at the Oxalosis and Hyperoxaluria Foundation's International Workshop on June 22, 2019, also showed that a single dose of DCR-PHXC led to normalisation or near-normalization of urinary oxalate levels in a majority of patients and was generally well-tolerated.
Allena Pharmaceuticals announced that it will present on its reloxaliase development program and the unmet need in patients with enteric hyperoxaluria in four sessions at the Oxalosis & Hyperoxaluria Foundation International Hyperoxaluria Workshop.
Francis Food Pantries and Shelters, the Wounded Warrior Project, and the Oxalosis and Hyperoxaluria Foundation.
In addition, acute oxalosis (such as in glyoxylate poisoning) can induce acute kidney damage due to the renal tubular blockage caused by the deposition of the CaOx crystals (2).
Further history revealed a daughter with oxalate stones disease as well, raising concern for hereditary oxalosis; other serological studies were negative, and biopsy confirmed acute tubular necrosis (ATN) with oxalate nephropathy.
Renal oxalosis has been postulated for ovine Aspergillus exposure [13] and may provide an alternative explanation for a case of renal oxalosis in a cervid [14].
Cutaneous oxalosis can occur as a primary disorder, when patients have metabolic errors and lack alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase or D-glycerate dehydrogenase.
(1) Amyloidosis (AL, ATTR, SSA) (2) Sarcoidosis (3) Hemochromatosis (4) Eosinophilic myocardial disease (5) Idiopathic RCM (6) Progressive systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) (7) Postradiation therapy (Hodgkin's lymphoma, breast cancer etc) (8) Anderson Fabry disease (9) Danon's disease (10) Friedreich's ataxia (11) Diabetic cardiomyopathy (restrictive phenotype) (12) Drug induced (anthracycline toxicity, methysergide, ergotamine, mercurial agents, etc.) (13) Mucopolysaccharidoses (Hurler's cardiomyopathy) (14) Myocardial oxalosis (15) Wegener's granulomatosis (16) Metastatic malignancies Table 2: Differential diagnosis between restrictive cardiomyopathy and constrictive pericarditis.
When a compound's supersaturation level exceeds the point of spontaneous crystallization, it can manifest as crystals on skin, as seen in calcium oxalate and oxalosis [1].