oxygen steelmaking

oxygen steelmaking

[′äk·sə·jən ′stēl‚māk·iŋ]
(metallurgy)
The manufacture of steel from molten pig iron and steel scrap by methods which employ pure oxygen gas (99+%) and suitable fluxes to remove carbon and phosphorus (and in part, sulfur) without introducing nitrogen or hydrogen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tata Steelexplained it was a result of 'slopping'which occasionally happened at the Basic Oxygen Steelmaking plant.
The incident is understood to have happened when the torpedo was on its way from the blast furnace to the BOS (basic oxygen steelmaking) plant.
The dad-of-one said it was a shock when he was made redundant as a driver transporting molten iron at the Basic Oxygen Steelmaking (BOS) plant in 2015.
Now, when the outdated open-hearth process is shut down, we need to be more active in developing basic oxygen steelmaking and compensate the loss of steelmaking facilities.
These techniques have been successfully used in thousands of field tests on a variety of machines, plants and structures, including pressure vessels, power transformers, bridges, process storage tanks, pipelines, valves, nuclear lift rigs, railroad tank cars, cranes, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking (BOS) vessels and compressed gas cylinders.
Material is arranged in chapters on hydrometallurgical extraction processes; electrometallurgical extraction processes, halide extraction processes; reduction of metal oxides; oxygen steelmaking; sulfide extraction processes; and metal refining processes.
The facility is to recover gas from the Basic Oxygen Steelmaking plant and reuse it elsewhere at the plant.
The project will recover gas from the basic oxygen steelmaking plant and reuse it elsewhere in the steelworks.
Oxygen steelmaking remains the dominant steelmaking process, accounting for two-thirds of global steel output and, indeed, gaining percentage points throughout the last few years.
Editorial for each issue includes coverage of such topics as oxygen steelmaking, colemaking, ladle metallurgy, environmental technologies, electric steelmaking, casting, iron-making and maintenance.
These changes included high productivity blast furnaces, external treatment of hot metal, oxygen steelmaking, alternate ironmaking processes, ultra high power arc furnaces, ladle metallurgy, vacuum processing, continuous casting, thermo-mechanical processing and novel coating technologies.
Also, Rowan wrote in a '72 "Progress in Melting" paper, that one of the greatest boons in the induction furnace business was the use of up to 100% low-cost steel scrap--released by the basic oxygen steelmaking process--for making ductile, gray and malleable iron.