oxygenate

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Related to oxygenated: Oxygenated blood

oxygenate

[′äk·sə·jə‚nāt]
(chemistry)
To treat, infuse, or combine with oxygen.
(materials)
An oxygen-containing compound, such as an alcohol or an ether, used as an additive to gasoline to improve octane rating or antiknock characteristics.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Seadrift debottleneck is the first of a series of announcements that will highlight major projects that are currently underway within the business," stated Mark Bassett, the company's global business director for oxygenated solvents.
Experts at AOL say the new product combines the health benefits of oxygenated gels with high quality pharmaceutical grade creams and lotions.
Table 7: World Historic Review for Oxygenated Solvents by
Here are some of the oxygenated waters they can choose from.
Caption(s): Holofiber has been proven in studies to increase oxygenated blood flow to the skin.
Motor Gasoline" includes conventional gasoline; all types of oxygenated gasoline, including gasohol; and reformulated gasoline, but excludes aviation gasoline.
According to AP, various environmental and agricultural organizations have lobbied to retain the oxygenated fuel mandate and DEQ director Stephanie Hallock said the state is considering the launch of alternative renewable fuel incentives before eliminating the region's winter fuel requirements.
The new research shows for the first time that subjecting sludge alternately to oxygenated and oxygen-deprived conditions is highly effective at eliminating the hormones, he says.
When exposed to nine auto fuel blends in a recent study conducted by Ticona, it was reported that Celcon CF802 was more resistant to oxygenated and non-oxygenated fuels than acetal homopolymer, polyester, and aliphatic polyketone at temperatures found in fuel tanks and outside the engine compartment.
Market value for oxygenated fuel additives (MTBE, ethanol, biodiesel and other oxygenates) will increase 4.
The study included 12 healthy college men and women who were randomly assigned to drink 16 ounces of tap water or super oxygenated water and then perform a multi-stage treadmill test.
Ronald Melnick, a toxicologist at the NIEHS Laboratory for Computational Biology and Risk Analysis, says Congress should recognize that oxygenated fuels were less beneficial than expected, and that "for the most part, the impact on CO was overestimated in the initial models.