Packing

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packing

1. the packaging of foodstuffs
2. Med
a. the application of a medical pack
b. gauze or other absorbent material for packing a wound
3. any substance or material used to make watertight or gastight joints, esp in a stuffing box
4. Engineering pieces of material of various thicknesses used to adjust the position of a component or machine before it is secured in its correct position or alignment
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Packing

 

(in chemical engineering), bodies of various shapes and dimensions that are used to fill the working spaces of equipment such as absorbers and rectification columns to increase the contact surface between a liquid and a gas or vapor, thus achieving increased interaction between the phases, and also to equalize streams, separate sprays, or change the nature of mixing. In absorption and rectification equipment, the liquid coats the packing with a thin film and flows over it. In this case, the size of the packing surface determines the contact surface with the gaseous phase.

Packing is loaded into various types of equipment onto perforated support plates or gratings either by random pouring or in a particular order (regular packings). The latter type of packing leads to lower hydraulic resistance and a higher throughput capacity of the equipment. The most common packing consists of thin-walled rings whose height is equal to their outside diameter. Rings 10–100 mm in diameter are used in most cases. Such rings are produced from chemically stable materials (mainly ceramic and, less frequently, steel rings). In addition to ring packing, other shapes are used—for example, hollow spheres with openings, saddle-shaped articles, spirals, and also packing in the form of stamped metal screens.

REFERENCE

Kasatkin, A. G. Osnovnye protsessy i apparaty khimicheskoi tekhnologii, 8th ed. Moscow, 1971.

Packing

 

a device to prevent or reduce the leakage of liquid or gas through gaps between joined parts. Packings are necessary because uneven areas remain on parts even after the most careful machining, forming gaps where the parts are joined. Packings may be designed for installation between stationary parts, in which case they are usually in the form of elastic washers or gaskets, or they may operate against moving surfaces. In the latter case the seal is achieved by closing the gaps with a filler, lubricant, or putty or by installing a labyrinth packing.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

What does it mean when you dream about packing?

A dream in which one is packing for a trip or in preparation for moving to a new residence may imply some significant change in the dreamer’s life. Perhaps a reorganization is in store or old issues or relationships are being left behind.

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

packing

[′pak·iŋ]
(crystallography)
Arrangement of atoms or ions in a crystal lattice.
(engineering)
(engineering acoustics)
Excessive crowding of carbon particles in a carbon microphone, produced by excessive pressure or by fusion particles due to excessive current, and causing lowered resistance and sensitivity.
(geology)
The arrangement of solid particles in a sediment or in sedimentary rock.
(graphic arts)
Paper used as a layer under the image or impression cylinder in letterpress printing or under the plate or blanket in lithographic printing in order to produce suitable pressure.
(metallurgy)
In powder metallurgy, a material in which compacts are embedded during presintering or sintering operations.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

packing

1. The stuffing or a thin ring of elastic material around a shaft or valve stem, or around a joint, to prevent fluid leakage.
2. Small stones embedded in mortar; used to fill the cracks between the larger stones.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Packing

(dreams)
This dream, like all dreams, could have several different meanings. If you are packing your stuff and storing it or packing to move, you may be concerned about significant changes that are going on in your life. Otherwise, your unconscious may be organizing and letting go of emotional “baggage.” Some other interpretations say that dreaming about packing is simply a hint from your unconscious that you are involved in too many activities and may need to pack some of them up and put them away.
Bedside Dream Dictionary by Silvana Amar Copyright © 2007 by Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
NeXRing packings distribute themselves evenly within the column packing section, while the structure of the rings provides for uniform liquid and gas flow through the column.
Dependents heat transfer coefficient of superficial gas velocity for both types of tested packings is shown in Figure 17.
This packing has all the above mentioned positive features which are inherent in packings of natural materials.
Thus, to know how particles pack in general, the researchers made a transparent, fluorescent packing of oil droplets in water, which allowed it to record three-dimensional images and examine the local geometry of each member of the pack.
"Anything that can happen will happen if you're in high enough dimensions," notes sphere- packing mathematician Henry Cohn of Microsoft Research in Redmond, Wash.
While mechanical seals have become a more common way to seal rotating pumping equipment, there are still many pump types--centrifugal, rotary, turbine and reciprocating--found in many industries that use compression packing. But when this type of packing fails, the consequences, from pump damage and pump failure to unscheduled plant shutdowns, can be devastating.
The process involves drilling (blind) and tapping into a low stressed area of the valve stuffing box, fitting an injection adaptor and drilling through the adaptor into the packing area.
So, the most-efficient codes correspond to the densest sphere packings.
Now, computer simulations indicate an unexpected result: Certain arrangements of modestly deformed spheres, called ellipsoids, exceed the maximum packing density of spheres.