pack

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pack

1. a complete set of similar things, esp a set of 52 playing cards
2. a group of animals of the same kind, esp hunting animals
3. Rugby the forwards of a team or both teams collectively, as in a scrum or in rucking
4. a small package, carton, or container, used to retail commodities, esp foodstuffs, cigarettes, etc.
5. short for pack ice
6. Med
a. a sheet or blanket, either damp or dry, for wrapping about the body, esp for its soothing effect
b. a material such as cotton or gauze for temporarily filling a bodily cavity, esp to control bleeding
7. a parachute folded and ready for use
8. Computing another name for deck

pack

[pak]
(computer science)
To reduce the amount of storage required to hold information by changing the method of encoding the data.
(industrial engineering)
To provide protection for an article or group of articles against physical damage during shipment; packing is accomplished by placing articles in a shipping container, and blocking, bracing, and cushioning them when necessary, or by strapping the articles or containers on a pallet or skid.
(mining engineering)
A pillar built in the waste area or roadside within a mine to support the mine roof; constructed from loose stones and dirt.
Waste rock or timber used to support the roof or underground workings or used to fill excavations. Also known as fill.
(oceanography)
(ordnance)
Part of a parachute assembly in which the canopy and shroud lines are folded and carried. Also known as pack assembly.

pack

(1) To compress data in order to save space. Unpack refers to decompressing data. See data compression.

(2) An instruction that converts a decimal number into a packed decimal format. Unpack converts a packed decimal number into decimal.

(3) In database programs, a command that removes records that have been marked for deletion.
References in classic literature ?
However thick the clouds may be, it is always visible, and announces the presence of an ice pack or bank.
On the top of some of the packs were perched several half-breed children, perfect little imps, with wild black eyes glaring from among elf locks.
The pack flew off the barge in every direction, and, after gambols, dug like terriers at Abu Hussein's many earths.
a servant who orders your dinner; who likes what you like; who packs your trunk, without forgetting your socks or your linen; who has charge of your keys and your secrets, and takes no advantage of all this!
In sixty dogs, forming six packs, divided as follows: the first, for the stag; the second, for the wolf; the third, for the wild boar; the fourth, for the hare; and the two others, for setters and protection.
Hitched to the branches of the trees close at hand were six horses, one of them a barb with gay trappings upon which the Bishop was wont to ride, and the others laden with packs of divers shapes and kinds, one of which made Robin's eyes glisten, for it was a box not overlarge, but heavily bound with bands and ribs of iron.
The aide-de-camp was sent to confirm the order which had not been clearly worded the day before, namely, that the commander in chief wished to see the regiment just in the state in which it had been on the march: in their greatcoats, and packs, and without any preparation whatever.
If you don't think it's lonesome wandering all by yourself through savage, unknown Pellucidar, why, just try it, and you will not wonder that I was glad of the company of this first dog--this living replica of the fierce and now extinct hyaenodon of the outer crust that hunted in savage packs the great elk across the snows of southern France, in the days when the mastodon roamed at will over the broad continent of which the British Isles were then a part, and perchance left his footprints and his bones in the sands of Atlantis as well.
The Tommies, their packs and accouterments slung, were waiting the summons to continue their return march.
Perhaps, if you are not too busy, you will see that Morrison packs some things for me.
A few minutes saw the rescued man lying among blankets, while fires were building, water was being carried, Joan's tent was going up, and Lalaperu was overhauling the packs and opening tins of provisions.
Well we knew them, running in packs, the terror of the grass-eating animals.