page


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page

1. Medieval history
a. a boy in training for knighthood in personal attendance on a knight
b. a youth in the personal service of a person of rank, esp in a royal household
2. Canadian a person employed in the debating chamber of the House of Commons, the Senate, or a legislative assembly to carry messages for members

Page

1. Sir Earle (Christmas Grafton). 1880--1961, Australian statesman; co-leader, with S. M. Bruce, of the federal government of Australia (1923--29)
2. Sir Frederick Handley. 1885--1962, English pioneer in the design and manufacture of aircraft

Page

 

in medieval Western Europe, a boy of noble birth in the first stage of the process of attaining knighthood. The page was a household servant at the court of an important feudal lord or king. On reaching the age of 14, he was promoted to the next stage, squire.

In prerevolutionary Russia the term “page” (pazh) designated a court title introduced in 1711. The page and chamber page (kamer-pazh) served the tsar’s family in various ways. Beginning in the second half of the 18th century, pages were pupils at the Corps of Pages (Pazheskii korpus).

page

[pāj]
(computer science)
A standard quantity of main-memory capacity, usually 512 to 4096 bytes or words, used for memory allocation and for partitioning programs into control sections.
A standard quantity of source program coding, usually 8 to 64 lines, used for displaying the coding on a cathode-ray tube.

page

A short thin wedge.

PAGE

(1)
A typesetting language.

["Computer Composition Using PAGE-1", J.L. Pierson, Wiley 1972].

page

(operating system)

page

(World-Wide Web)

page

(1) A segment of a running program that is transferred back and forth between memory and disk (memory for execution and disk for temporary storage). See virtual memory.

(2) A Web page, which is a single HTML file and related multimedia files. See World Wide Web.

(3) A printed page; for example, an 8.5 x 11" sheet of paper.

(4) In videotex systems, a transmitted frame.
References in classic literature ?
She was not very old, though plainly past forty, strong, healthy, vigorous, and sun-dried; and seeing her daughter and the page on horseback, she exclaimed, "What's this, child?
The page thereupon engaged him quite fiercely, and Robin found that he had many pretty little tricks at fencing.
The three came toward where Robin Hood sat, all the band staring with might and main, for never had they seen so gay a sight as this young Page, nor one so richly clad in silks and velvets and gold and jewels.
But if you will be guided by me, spare yourself the reading of those pages to come, which describe our brother's terrible expiation of his heartless marriage.
He lasts through several pages of this record of the enduring soil.
But when his door finally closed behind Anne and Leslie they knew that he went straight to it, and as they walked home they pictured the delight of the old man poring over the printed pages wherein his own life was portrayed with all the charm and color of reality itself.
For the second day continue the reading, at least through the story of Beowulf's exploits in Hrothgar's country (in Hall's translation through page 75, in Child's through page 60), and write your discussion.
All these works, however, I am well convinced, will be dead long before this page shall offer itself to thy perusal; for however short the period may be of my own performances, they will most probably outlive their own infirm author, and the weakly productions of his abusive contemporaries.
It was at page three hundred and eighteen--a domestic bit concerning Robinson Crusoe's marriage, as follows:
I can lay my hand on my heart, and declare that every page has charmed, refreshed, delighted me.
It is clearly a reference to the words in a page of some book.
But as it is wholesome that the parsimonious public should know what has been doing, and still is doing, in this connexion, I mention here that everything set forth in these pages concerning the Court of Chancery is substantially true, and within the truth.