page reader

page reader

[′pāj ‚rēd·ər]
(computer science)
In character recognition, a character reader capable of processing cut-form documents of varying sizes; sometimes capable of reading information in reel forms.
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Regardless of which team you support, whether as a regular match attender or as a dedicated results' page reader, I wish you enjoyment and your team success.
The volume closes with a basic map of brain regions, a neuroscience glossary, and a four page reader on the contributions of seven key sociocultural theorists, such as Etienne Wenger and Barbara Rogoff.
Website visitors simply click on an icon to download keyboard and mouse replacement solutions for free, including a webcam-based hands-free movement tracking system, a page reader, predictive typing, and other customizable options.
12 mins LESSON 17 review, optical font, optical reader, page reader, MICR, MICR reader, hand-writing optical reader, audio response units, review, analog-digital, analog converter.
Crunchy will also license IBM's Home Page reader technology which can assist visually impaired people access the Internet while IBM will license the PageScreamer product suite from Crunchy.
User interfaces are being enhanced to work with several assistive technologies including the talking browser Home Page Reader developed by IBM and the screen reader JAWS (Job Access With Speech) from Freedom Scientific.
IBM's Home Page Reader advertises itself as "the Voice of the World Wide Web" -- "a spoken on-ramp to the Information Highway for computer users who are blind or visually impaired." It works with Netscape Navigator; the user navigates using the keyboard, and there are special navigation features that allow the user to work through information in formats such as tables.
Next January IBM Corp will start selling a 'talking web browser' which it says is designed to "open the doors of the world wide web to blind and visually impaired computer users." IBM says the new software, called Home Page Reader, utilizes its ViaVoice OutLoud technology to scan web pages and read them out loud.
These were the precursors to the company's ScreenReader[TM]/DOS, ScreenReader/2, and IBM Home Page Reader products.
LexisNexis user interfaces are being enhanced to work with several assistive technologies, including IBM's Home Page Reader, a talking browser, and Freedom Scientific's JAWS (Job Access With Speech) screen reader.
We've got one of the brilliant new 2-in-1 systems - comprising pram and pushchair plus compatible car seat and worth pounds 400 - to give away FREE to a lucky Parenting Page reader. To be in with a chance of winning, simply call 0901 564 3097 (or 1550 923868 in the Republic of Ireland) and answer the following question: