Pahlavi

(redirected from pahlavis)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to pahlavis: SAVAK, Reza Shah

Pahlavi

1. Mohammed Reza . 1919--80, shah of Iran (1941--79); forced into exile (1979) during civil unrest following which an Islamic republic was established led by the Ayatollah Khomeini
2. his father, Reza. 1877--1944, shah of Iran (1925--41). Originally an army officer, he gained power by a coup d'état (1921) and was chosen shah by the National Assembly. He reorganized the army and did much to modernize Iran

Pahlavi

 

a dynasty in Iran, in power since Dec. 12, 1925. The shahs of the Pahlavi dynasty have been Reza Shah Pahlavi (1925–41) and Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi (since Sept. 16, 1941).

References in periodicals archive ?
There was a long period of excellent relations during the Pahlavi period, before the 1979 Islamic Revolution and the coming of a religiously oriented government [in Iran] strained relations with a neighbor that was militantly secular in orientation," Bakhash recently told me.
Published just after the royal marriage between Princess Fawziyya and Prince Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, the book served more as a propaganda piece promoting the union of the young royals than an example of sound historical inquiry.
While noting that bonds between Persians and Jews are more than 2,000 years old, dating back to the marriage of Persia's Xerxes and Queen Esther in the 5th century BC, Parsi focuses on more recent history, from the Pahlavi dynasty and the Zionist founders of the state of Israel.
Muhammad Reza Pahlavi, the shah of Iran from 1941 to 1979, would embrace this policy in his efforts to mend governmental relations with the hierocracy.
The Pahlavis kept a small garrison here until 1931, and one can stand in the commandant's lodge in the citadel and look out at the bleak vista of desert and dust, experiencing for a moment the isolation and hopelessness that must have afflicted every soldier posted here.
But Reuters said Setad generally tries to leave a seemingly legal trail to justify property confiscations, perhaps because the revolution condemned property confiscation by the Pahlavis.
Public hangings, discontinued by Reza Pahlavi in the 1920s, were re-initiated by the new regime as an exercise of power and instillation of fear.
Although women have served in the Iranian legislature and as government ministers since the 1950s, there are more women in the current parliament than ever served under the regime of Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi and his father Reza Pahlavi.
Such is exemplified in those who want to see the monarchy reinstated and for Iran to return to its former "glory" under the Pahlavis, whilst totally ignoring how Mohammad Reza Shah lost his Peacock Throne in the first place: an obsession with being the fifth industrial power in the world rather than improving the status of his people, which led to an ailing economy and countless human rights violations.
Substantial change in Shiaism cannot be initiated or completed exclusively by secular intellectuals, nor can it be achieved by force and intimidation, as the sad story of the Pahlavis indicates.
During the Pahlavi era (1925-1979), the Golestan (Place of Roses) was used for formal royal receptions but the Pahlavis built their own palace at Niavaran to the north of the city.
That will give the Pahlavis a chance to bid, if they are so minded--although it is unlikely they could meet BBC standards.