Pahlavi

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Related to pahlavis: SAVAK, Reza Shah

Pahlavi

1. Mohammed Reza . 1919--80, shah of Iran (1941--79); forced into exile (1979) during civil unrest following which an Islamic republic was established led by the Ayatollah Khomeini
2. his father, Reza. 1877--1944, shah of Iran (1925--41). Originally an army officer, he gained power by a coup d'état (1921) and was chosen shah by the National Assembly. He reorganized the army and did much to modernize Iran

Pahlavi

 

a dynasty in Iran, in power since Dec. 12, 1925. The shahs of the Pahlavi dynasty have been Reza Shah Pahlavi (1925–41) and Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi (since Sept. 16, 1941).

References in periodicals archive ?
There's an interesting generational divide going on here to where young Iranians are saying to their parents and grandparents, the same people who marched against the Shah and Pahlavis, 'Why did you get rid of that system and put this one in place?
Iran and Persia are used interchangeably in this report to denote the empire, nation, or state prior to the Pahlavi dynasty's strictly referencing the state as "Iran" in the early 20th century.
There was a long period of excellent relations during the Pahlavi period, before the 1979 Islamic Revolution and the coming of a religiously oriented government [in Iran] strained relations with a neighbor that was militantly secular in orientation," Bakhash recently told me.
Published just after the royal marriage between Princess Fawziyya and Prince Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, the book served more as a propaganda piece promoting the union of the young royals than an example of sound historical inquiry.
It just makes false sentiments and it is really far from the authentic art" Thus during the Pahlavi era, despite supportive initiatives by Iranian National Television and Radio, the widespread popularizing of pop music meant that Iranian classical music was becoming more and more marginalized.
Under the two kings of the Pahlavi dynasty, Reza Khan and his son Mohammad Reza, the freedom of press and speech in Iran dramatically declined, while the persecuted opposition went underground or took refuge abroad.
Persian old guard in faux-Versailles mansionsthe Shah Reza Pahlavi crowdgiving way to a generation of rich, nubile proto-Kardashians posing in their clothes in the rooftop hotel pool.
In May 1978, Parsons cabled foreign secretary David Owen to assure him there was no "serious risk" of the Pahlavi dynasty being ousted while the Shah was at the helm.
The Shah was ousted and the Ayatollah Khomeini and his band of radical mullahs replaced the Pahlavis and adopted a violent anti-American ("Great Satan") and anti-Israeli ("Little Satan") agenda.
A well-argued, lucidly narrated and meticulously researched work, this volume mainly focuses on the development of the Shi'i ceremonies under three successive authoritarian regimes: Qajars, Pahlavis, and the Islamic Republic.
Under the Pahlavis, the goal was to elevate Iranian nationalism over Islamic identity.
After an introductory chapter entitled "Persia: Place and Idea," the author marches through history strictly in tune to changes in ruling dynasty: Achaemenids; Alexander, Seleucids, and Parthians; Sasanians; "Non-Iranian" Arabs, Turks, and Mongols; Safavids; Qajars; and Pahlavis and the Islamic Republic.