pail


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pail

[pāl]
(design engineering)
A cylindrical or slightly tapered container.
References in classic literature ?
I think you had better stand by the pail for five minutes, Rebecca; it may help you to control your thirst.
Tod descended safely from the chair, and endeavoured to get up again with the pail of water.
When Tess had changed her bonnet for a hood, and was really on her stool under the cow, and the milk was squirting from her fists into the pail, she appeared to feel that she really had laid a new foundation for her future.
I was sent from the house, half a mile away, to carry to him a pail of beer.
There's nothing in the pail that shouldn't have been thrown away, and no stale pieces in the bread box.
Now," said the Fox, "go to that near-by brook, bring back a pail full of water, and sprinkle it over the spot.
For especially wicked am I in the morning: at the early hour when the pail rattleth at the well, and horses neigh warmly in grey lanes:--
I ate my breakfast with pleasure and was about to remove a plank to procure myself a little water when I heard a step, and looking through a small chink, I beheld a young creature, with a pail on her head, passing before my hovel.
As Elizabeth watched, he dropped the pail and lashed the air violently for a while.
So then the Doctor and all his animals went off, carrying pails and saucepans, to look for water on the island, while the swallows took their rest.
Now the forester had an old cook, who one evening took two pails and began to fetch water, and did not go once only, but many times, out to the spring.
When she fell she grabbed hold of the shelf with all the milk pails and stewpans on it, and it gave way and went down with her and made a splendid crash.