paint

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Related to paint into a corner: paint oneself into a corner, worse for wear

paint

paint, mixture of a pigment and a binding medium, usually thinned with a solvent to form a liquid vehicle. The term includes lacquer, portland cement paint, printing ink, calcimine, and whitewash. Paint is used to decorate or protect surfaces and is generally applied in thin coats which dry (by evaporation or by oxidation of the vehicle) to an adhesive film. Industrial finishes are usually applied by spraying or immersion and are often hardened by baking. Pigments, finely ground, impart color (including black and white) and affect the consistency, crack resistance, and flow characteristics of paint. They may be manipulated to produce glossy, satin, or flat finishes. Oil paints are pigments dispersed in a drying oil such as linseed oil, castor oil, or tung oil. These oils are diluted with a thinner, usually turpentine; metallic salts that catalyze oxidation of the oil may be added to increase the rate of drying. For water paints, pigment is dissolved in a mixture of water with a binder such as glue or casein, or emulsified in a latex polymer. Latex emulsion paint provides such excellent durability and color retention that it now dominates the paint market. Enamel paints contain varnish and usually dry to a hard, glossy finish. Industrial lacquers (widely used on automobiles and furniture) are valued for rapid drying to a hard finish. The vehicle is commonly pyroxylin in an organic solvent. Baked acrylic finishes have recently become popular for industrial products such as automobiles and appliances.

Bibliography

See C. R. Martens, Technology of Paints, Varnishes, and Lacquers (1968).

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Paint

A protective finish for architectural elements, most often composed of a coloring agent ground in linseed oil or other synthetic base.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

paint

[pānt]
(computer science)
To fill an area of a display screen or printed output with a color, shade of gray, or image.
(electronics)
Vernacular for a target image on a radarscope.
(materials)
A mixture of a pigment and a vehicle, such as oil or water, that together form a liquid or paste that can be applied to a surface to provide an adherent coating that imparts color to and often protects the surface.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

paint

A liquid solution of pigment in a suitable vehicle of oil, organic solvent, or water; liquid when applied but dries to form an adherent, protective, and decorative coating. Often categorized according to the solvent used for thinning, for example, water-thinned paint or solvent-thinned paint. Also see acrylic paint, cement-water paint, epoxy paint, latex paint, synthetic rubber-base paint, vinyl paint, water-based paint.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

paint

(1) In computer graphics, to "paint" the screen using a tablet stylus or mouse to simulate a paintbrush. See paint program.

(2) To transfer an image as in the phrase "the laser printer paints the image onto a photosensitive drum."

(3) To create a screen form by typing anywhere on screen. To "paint" the screen with text.
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