pair

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Related to paired: paired data, paired up, parried

pair

1. a male and a female animal of the same species, esp such animals kept for breeding purposes
2. Parliamentary procedure
a. two opposed members who both agree not to vote on a specified motion or for a specific period of time
b. the agreement so made
3. two playing cards of the same rank or denomination
4. Cricket short for a pair of spectacles (see spectacles (sense 2))
5. Logic Maths
a. a set with two members
b. an ordered set with two members

pair

[per]
(electricity)
Two like conductors employed to form an electric circuit.
(mechanical engineering)
Two parts in a kinematic mechanism that mutually constrain relative motion; for example, a sliding pair composed of a piston and cylinder.
(science and technology)
A set of two things that are identical or nearly so, or are designed to function as a unit.

pair

To establish a wireless connection. See pairing and Bluetooth pairing.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Alex Brown Research, "The primary benefit to the paired and stapled REIT structure [is] the elimination of potential conflicts of interests, with ancillary benefits, including the elimination of "leakage," [and] the ability of the management team to be actively involved in property-level operations..."
Steaks, roast beef, and prime rib are better paired with the likes of the "new generation" American pale ales or a traditional Burton-style ale; both have heavy duty malt and cedar notes equivalent to the weight of a Cabernet.
The memory of who paired objects survives, however, in those patients who experience a sense of familiarity upon encountering a pair of items again, although they can't explicitly remember having previously seen the duo.
At that point, the tots looked just as briefly at new presentations of each shape paired with the sound previously associated with the other shape.
Last year, Zhi-Xun Shen of Stanford University and his collaborators used this technique, known as photoemission spectroscopy, to determine the binding force between paired electrons in six high-temperature superconductors, including yttrium barium copper oxide.