paired electron

paired electron

[¦perd i′lek‚trän]
(physical chemistry)
One of two electrons that form a valence bond between two atoms.
References in periodicals archive ?
The study is the first definitive evidence of coupled electrons in a solid material too warm for superconductivity, a state in which paired electrons move with no resistance.
The combination of paired electrons and synchronized movement ensures that electric current can flow resistance-free.
Atoms that are missing electrons combine with atoms that have an extra electron, creating a stable molecule with evenly paired electrons and a neutral electric charge.
On the other hand, atoms and molecules with paired electrons like the noble gases of Group 8 on the Periodic Table tend to be unreactive.
In the high-temperature superconductors, paired electrons seem to repel each other.
Since carbon tends to form covalent bonds, which contain paired electrons, it seems an unlikely candidate to be magnetized.
The results may also provide insight into superconductivity, a form of superfluidity in which paired electrons flow without resistance.
Last year, Zhi-Xun Shen of Stanford University and his collaborators used this technique, known as photoemission spectroscopy, to determine the binding force between paired electrons in six high-temperature superconductors, including yttrium barium copper oxide.
For the line to move, the kinks have to separate the paired electrons in front of them.
An atom or molecule with paired electrons has no net spin and exhibits only mild, subtle magnetic effects.
However, the paired electrons in BCS theory are in a quantum state (L=0) that does not allow them the freedom for the suggested collective action.