palaeography

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palaeography

1. the study of the handwritings of the past, and often the manuscripts as well, so that they may be dated, read, etc., and may serve as historical and literary sources
2. a handwriting of the past
References in periodicals archive ?
This research was inspired partly by the presence in Rome of the greatest palaeographer of that time, Angelo Cardinal Mai, whose work on palimpsests had brought to light previously unknown passages from the writings of over 350 authors, pre-eminently the De republica of Cicero.
Those who seek to rewrite history on the evidence of early maps and charts should not so readily ignore the research of relevant academics, historians of cartography, historical linguists, toponymists and palaeographers.
Significantly, the script demonstrates features identified by palaeographers as characteristic of the Iberian Pregothic and Gothic script forms.
The Handlist adds several new items (mainly fragments and membra disecta of manuscripts) that have come to light over the past two decades, includes Anglo-Saxon manuscripts in libraries in Japan and New Zealand, and excludes manuscripts recorded in the `Preliminary list' which palaeographers have since dated after 1100 or which cannot be shown with certainty to have been written in or to have reached England by 1100.
The carefully-positioned signs were in some cases within a cartouche or filled for enhanced prominence, and some have been studied by palaeographers (Cheung 1983,368).
Both Hayer and Ott are experienced and judicious palaeographers, in whose expertise one can have full confidence.
Most early palaeographers did not appreciate, or even understand, the holistic intent and potential of modern field archaeology.
Unlike a great many examples of the genre, Festschriften for palaeographers have a history of being instant classics.
The entries, however, offer an impressive, if piecemenal, account of this form of decoration, which first became widespread in the late thirteenth century, flourished in central Europe during the first half of the fourteenth century, and recently has drawn the attention of codicologists and palaeographers as a useful means of dating and grouping manuscripts.