palaeography

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palaeography

1. the study of the handwritings of the past, and often the manuscripts as well, so that they may be dated, read, etc., and may serve as historical and literary sources
2. a handwriting of the past
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
And she also restates the argument of this edited collection of essays in order to emphasize how the attention to detail, detail that characterizes the work of palaeographers and codicologists, in fact delivers much of what the editors call for in their introductory remarks.
This research was inspired partly by the presence in Rome of the greatest palaeographer of that time, Angelo Cardinal Mai, whose work on palimpsests had brought to light previously unknown passages from the writings of over 350 authors, pre-eminently the De republica of Cicero.
Those who seek to rewrite history on the evidence of early maps and charts should not so readily ignore the research of relevant academics, historians of cartography, historical linguists, toponymists and palaeographers. They are aware of hidden 'rocks' and 'reefs' which radar, sonar and astro-navigation can never detect.
A scribal revolution such as this, and the new behaviour patterns to which it led, are based on a collection of techniques, materials and conventions of writing which developed in the twelfth century (and which are well known to us thanks to the work of palaeographers and historians of medieval books and culture; see Martin and Vezin 1990; Benson and Constable 1991; Parkes 1976, 1992): these were new types of writing, use of paper, indexes for visual consultation of the contents, different techniques for structuring the page in paragraphs and chapters, etc., all techniques which contributed to the creation of this bookish idea of the concept of `text'.
Because they concern themselves almost exclusively with classification of letter forms and with production traits -- the data considered most essential for dating, localization, and transcription of texts -- palaeographers and codicologists have largely failed to consider the phenomena that interest students of the history of reading most.
The two scholars hoped to clarify the question by broadening the horizon in a meeting of palaeographers, textual critics, and historians.
Jones acknowledges himself as an outsider here, as his references to the opinions of 'experts' and 'palaeographers' make clear.
Annotation in informal hands is not entirely absent, but informal notes, for the first time in the history of annotation, are a rarity.(40) Indeed, the combination of distinctive format and script in these texts of law attracted, long ago, the attention of palaeographers, who recognized in them a new form of book emanating--in the words often repeated by E.
The scholarship presented in these eleven essays is profound but accessible (in which respect many of the contributors acknowledge a debt to the editor), and as a result will be used by the enquiring undergraduate as well as those more advanced palaeographers, historians, and art-historians who will be its primary audience.
Recent work by several palaeographers has argued that the liturgical books from St Victor have long been misdated; Professor Fassler suggests a date of 1140-60 for the gradual fragment Paris, Bibliotheque Nationale, fonds lat.
Doble--a disguise few palaeographers would have penetrated.
Malcolm Parkes's Scribes, Scripts and Readers, a selection of his shorter publications from 1958 to 1991, is an essential tool within the working libraries not just of palaeographers but of historians and literary scholars as well, and the present volume should quickly find its place on their shelves.