palaeography

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Related to palaeographical: paleographical

palaeography

1. the study of the handwritings of the past, and often the manuscripts as well, so that they may be dated, read, etc., and may serve as historical and literary sources
2. a handwriting of the past
References in periodicals archive ?
Lowe, Codices Latini Antiquiores: a palaeographical guide to Latin manuscripts prior to the ninth century, 11 vol.
In the second chapter, the manuscript is described from a physical point of view, considering both codicological and palaeographical elements.
This large discrepancy needs a palaeographical justification.
Chapter eleven focuses on the linguistic, stylistic and palaeographical features of another Dublin manuscript of the later Middle Ages, Royal Irish Academy Library MS 12 R31, a deluxe copy of a book of hours for Sarum use produced in Rouen around 1444 for the marriage of Sir Thomas Hoo and Eleanor Welles.
In 1892 Otto Jiriczek published a diplomatic edition of it from the better of the two manuscripts, MS K 23 4 in the Royal Library at Stockholm, but his introduction, focusing exclusively on palaeographical and linguistic features, was so utterly uninformative that not a single word was devoted to the content of the text.
1997, Holocene oscillations of the Caspian Sea and forecasts based on palaeographical reconstructions: Quaternary International, v.
With his recognized palaeographical expertise, Hanna succeeds in transforming codicological details into hard evidence, always so elusive in medieval literary studies.
Breaking nearly a century of scholarly neglect, Kruger (New Testament, Reformed Theological Seminary, Charlotte, North Carolina) offers a full palaeographical, historical, and exegetical evaluation in order to clarify its place in the scope of early gospel traditions.
Joining an innovative close reading of the manuscript's illuminations to codicological and palaeographical analysis, Verkerk offers a convincing argument for the abandonment of the often repeated but weakly supported attribution of the manuscript to Spain in favor of Italy and then attributes the manuscript's production to Rome in the late sixth century.
Neither group, seal-holders nor those with written personal names, can be identified with the "scribes," insofar as we can understand them from the limited number (10) of tentative palaeographical groupings identified within the sealing inscriptions.
Parkes, English Cursive Book Hands 1250-1500, Oxford Palaeographical Handbooks (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1969), no.
Combining this philological palaeographical and codicological evidence, it is possible to arrive at or: to reach?