palaeography

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Related to palaeographically: paleographical

palaeography

1. the study of the handwritings of the past, and often the manuscripts as well, so that they may be dated, read, etc., and may serve as historical and literary sources
2. a handwriting of the past
References in periodicals archive ?
The inscription may palaeographically be datable to the seventh century (80) and records gifts made to two lingas by a certain Harsavarman, 'grandson [napta] of King [rajan] isanavarman'.
Palaeographically the miswriting of cysas six as cysa six <cysa vi> would then involve a scribal simplification of <ss> [greater than] <s> in scriptio continua.
GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] is palaeographically close to V; but other candidates, giving similar content, might be [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (cf.
Confusion in the printing-house, however, might be palaeographically possible if, like most dramatic manuscripts, the copy employed abbreviated italic speech prefixes.
61: The proposal to read 'cn here (Allen gives the outdated transcription kn) is palaeographically impossible; the vertical strokes are definitely too long and too asymmetrically present only on the lower part of the sign.
The Calatagan pot inscription (CPI) has remained a puzzle for decades despite numerous attempts to decipher it palaeographically by the comparative analysis of its symbols.
xxiii; but this is palaeographically improbable and should not be pressed.
52 'As much as child e'er loved, or father, friend' is defended by Weis, but unconvincingly: friendship is not an issue in this speech, and F's 'found' must be right; otherwise we are required to imagine a reviser who (both here and in scores of other cases) replaced the original reading with a palaeographically similar word, even when changing a noun to a verb.
1-40r) may well date from a year or two earlier: the fact that it is palaeographically distinct from the rest of the source (47) and terminates abruptly in the middle of a gathering suggests that there may have been an ensuing lull in the copying process.
Itacus' is palaeographically possible as a misreading of `Hams', H becoming It and m turning into cu by minim confusion.
This sentence has long been regarded as problematic; Kirchhoff's emendation is palaeographically simple and has met with general approval, but if [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] is taken to mean `temples', as is usual, the phrase is not without its difficulties.
bhumisamskrta cannot be emended into bhuti[degrees], as Waldschmidt does, but, if at all, rather into the palaeographically similar [degrees]samstrta.