paleface


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paleface

a derogatory term for a White person, said to have been used by North American Indians
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The "language of the paleface," Smith added, "is precisely the language of her self-constitution" (135).
If one bristles a bit at the looseness, "the veering off of signification" with which Guston plays with Klan imagery or Olson "half-mockingly" refers to himself as "the ultimate paleface" (or, conversely, if one fails to see the humorous component in Martinez's intervention), it's important to realize that as an artist Guston seems to have felt an ethical need to get inside the head of evil.
This brings to mind GWB, that other paleface from the opposite continent who had claimed there were WMDs in the land of veiled women.
The author covers Judy HollidayAEs work in Born Yesterday, Dean Martin and Jerry LewisAEs work in Sailor Beware, Bob HopeAEs work in Son of Paleface, and many other comedians and their films in the 1950s.
The former cartoonist co-wrote the comedian's hit movie "Paleface" (1948), Hope's then greatest solo commercial success.
Some time ago I met a coloured acquaintance who greeted me by calling me 'Paleface'.
One of the most successful trapshooting promotion trips undertaken in recent years came to a close on Saturday, November 27, in Boston, when the team of touring major league baseball players competed against the Paleface Gun Club combination ...
WEDNESDAY THE PALEFACE, DAVE, 11AM Classic comedy in which Bob Hope takes his endless supply of one-liners out West.
Hubbard has reversed a time-honored formula and has given a thriller to which, at the end of every chapter or so, another paleface bites the dust ...
Titles such as Monsieur Beaucaire, My Favorite Brunette, and The Paleface, not to mention his Bing Crosby pictures like Road to Morocco and Road to Utopia, may not be all-time classics, but they can still make an audience laugh.
"For the first time in the States," wrote William Howard Russell of the London Times as his train crossed through into North Carolina in 1861, "I noticed barefooted people" and "poor broken-down shanties or loghuts" filled with "paleface ...
Which comedian co-starred with Jane Russell in the 1948 film The Paleface? 5.