paleobiology

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Related to paleobiologist: paleobiology, palaeobiologist

paleobiology

[‚pā·lē·ō·bī′äl·ə·jē]
(paleontology)
The branch of paleontology concerned with the biologic aspects of the history of life.
References in periodicals archive ?
rex," says Karen Chin, a paleobiologist (scientist studying prehistoric life) who specializes in coprolites.
After all, according to University of Chicago paleobiologist D.
Also, computer simulations by paleobiologist Dale Russell and aeronautics engineer Parvez Kumar a decade ago showed that primordial pterodactyls of 65 million years ago could only have flown in an atmosphere 50% denser than that of modern-day Earth.
Erickson, a paleobiologist at Florida State University.
The bigger you are, the more likely you are to be facing extinction," Jonathan Payne, co-author of the study and paleobiologist at Stanford's School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences, said (http://news.stanford.edu/2016/09/14/larger-marine-animals-higher-risk-extinction-humans-blame/) in a statement.
They look a bit like E.T.," said molecular paleobiologist Jakob Vinther of the University of Bristol in Britain, referring to the friendly alien in the 1982 film "E.T.
shipporum's distinct horns and spikes may have allowed individuals of the species to recognize one another, says Jordan Mallon, a paleobiologist involved in the research at the Canadian Museum of Nature in Ottawa.
Study coauthor Kenshu Shimada, a paleobiologist at DePaul University, Chicago, Ill., says Rhinconichthys are exceptionally rare, known previously by only one species from England, but a new skull from North America, discovered in Colorado, along with the reexamination of another skull from Japan, have tripled the number of species in the genus with a greatly expanded geographical range.
"I will never stop being ravenously hungry for science, no matter how well it feeds me," writes Hope Jahren, a paleobiologist, winner of three Fulbright Awards, a professor at the University of Hawaii and now author of a marvelous memoir, Lab Girl.
David Sepkoski, a historian of science, is the son of the late University of Chicago quantitative paleobiologist Jack Sepkoski (1948-1999).
According to the study led by paleobiologist Juan Abella, of the Autonomous University of Barcelona, the fossil record prove that the male Indarctos arctoides was much larger than the female, which is in contradiction with previous research that suggested that bear species with strong sex differences tend to have shorter penis bones and mating systems.
But that claim - one made by the researchers in a press release, but omitted from the Nature Geoscience article itself - isn't sitting well with paleobiologist J.W.