paleobiology

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Related to paleobiologist: paleobiology, palaeobiologist

paleobiology

[‚pā·lē·ō·bī′äl·ə·jē]
(paleontology)
The branch of paleontology concerned with the biologic aspects of the history of life.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the study led by paleobiologist Juan Abella, of the Autonomous University of Barcelona, the fossil record prove that the male Indarctos arctoides was much larger than the female, which is in contradiction with previous research that suggested that bear species with strong sex differences tend to have shorter penis bones and mating systems.
But that claim - one made by the researchers in a press release, but omitted from the Nature Geoscience article itself - isn't sitting well with paleobiologist J.
I am neither a paleobiologist nor an Oxford professor, and this review may be too harsh.
Dark stripes in a 100-million-year-old fossilized feather--coming from an early bird or a dinosaur--contain particles that closely resemble, in size and arrangement, black melanin particles in modern bird feathers, paleobiologist Jakob Vinther of Yale University and colleagues report in an upcoming Biology Letters.
This fossil is helping confirm that the dinosaurs were indeed, by definition, cold-blooded, and that in all likelihood birds are not the descendants of any known group of dinosaurs," notes paleobiologist Nicholas Geist.
Farmer, a geologist and paleobiologist at the Ames Research Center in Mountain View, Calif.
Toothed maniraptorans "seemed to be doing just fine right up until the extinction," says University of Oxford paleobiologist Roger Benson.
Immortality might be much more common than we think," Dartmouth university paleobiologist Kevin Peterson (http://www.
That this was published by Nature is beyond my understanding," wrote Martin Brasier, a paleobiologist at the University of Oxford who was not involved in the study, in an email.
Simon Conway Morris, evolutionary paleobiologist at the University of Cambridge, argues convincingly that there is a kind of direction to evolution in that it has an ability to repeatedly "navigate" to the correct solution to various life problems.
Paleobiologist Jennifer Botha-Brink of South Africa's National Museum in Bloemfontein isn't convinced.
Gregory Sawyer and UF postdoctoral researcher Brandon Krick, Florida State University paleobiologist Gregory Erickson determined the teeth of hadrosaurs - n herbivore from the late Cretaceous period - had six tissues in their teeth instead of two.