palaeography

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palaeography

1. the study of the handwritings of the past, and often the manuscripts as well, so that they may be dated, read, etc., and may serve as historical and literary sources
2. a handwriting of the past
References in periodicals archive ?
Rouaud wrote his tale after careful research and lengthy consultations with historians and paleographers.
The "Prayer for King Jonathan" is admittedly difficult to read, its decipherment a triumph of skill and determination of the paleographers.
In these pages philologists join linguists, grammarians, social and economic historians, paleographers, "text-critical" scholars, and literary historians.
The promotional material on the front Map of the book reflects a desire to reach a broad audience--not only "musicologists, philologists, paleographers, codicologists and historians" but also the "non-specialist public interested in learning more about a somewhat obscure part of written cultural heritage.
This volume results from a series of seminars conducted between 1983 and 2005 at Newberry Library, Chicago, by Italian paleographers Franca Nardelli and Armando Petrucci.
There is no shortage of similar accounts--suffice it to say that Mei is correct in reporting that "most paleographers agree that the two dots or two short horizontal lines do represent a feature of the blade of a cutting instrument" ("Sino-Tibetan 'Year'," 118).
In 1845, palimpsest was transformed from a technical term used by paleographers into a metaphor that spread quickly across disciplines and might now be used by anyone who notices more than the surface of a phenomenon.
Published for an exhibition in 1997, this study of manuscripts and printed books originally from the collection of the cathedral of Florence combines historical essays with a beautifully illustrated catalog that will be of exceptional interest to musicologists, liturgists, historians, art historians, and paleographers.
12) These considerations led modern paleographers to understand the historical process of character formation as consisting of only three categories: pictographs (e angling), phonetic compounds (xingsh[e.
of Edinburgh) explains what papyrologists, archeologists and paleographers have found in the early texts and artifacts and shows how the dimensions and configuration of these physical objects expressed first belief.
A similar effort has been undertaken with regard to the Caroline miniscule by paleographers.
This article may also be of interest to paleographers of the Malayalam script.