palaeography

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palaeography

1. the study of the handwritings of the past, and often the manuscripts as well, so that they may be dated, read, etc., and may serve as historical and literary sources
2. a handwriting of the past
References in periodicals archive ?
An Afterword by Kathryn Kerby-Fulton suggests that paleographers have already made enormous but overlooked "conceptual contributions" that may help in the realization of Johnston's and Van Dussen's project.
It should be of interest to paleographers, epigraphers, art historians, graphic designers, and all others whose work involves visual language.
Our diverse, often overlapping creeds of post-structuralism, French theory, cultural materialism, New Criticism, New Historicism, and psychoanalysis, among others, mean that our at times interchangeable ranks can range from blogging, face-booking, wiki-ing, early-adopting emissaries of IT to historians of print culture, paleographers, epigraphists, and iconologists.
Paleographers have studied these ancient inscriptions and suggest that the spirals symbolically connect the human soul with the divine.
The next section is a more detailed examination of issues related to bookbindings, a study traditionally ignored by both paleographers and codicologists.
Rouaud wrote his tale after careful research and lengthy consultations with historians and paleographers. Even though he told "France Culture" that he is only formulating hypotheses, he hopes to be taken seriously.
The "Prayer for King Jonathan" is admittedly difficult to read, its decipherment a triumph of skill and determination of the paleographers. Perhaps, it was indicated to Hanan Eshel, the Qumran sectarians found it equally difficult to read, hence they preserved it without quite realizing its contents, and the difficulty this text would pose to accepted theories thousands of years later.
I have found that there is a certain sympathy of style between mathematicians and paleographers, however, for both seem to cultivate an almost lapidary terseness that often forces the reader to erect again around some construction the scaffolding that the author has carefully taken down.
The text is compelling for grown-ups, too, for its capacity to sustain the detailed intellectual interests of linguists, literary theorists, textual critics, editors, historians, translators, poets, metrists, folklorists, archaeologists, paleographers, and codicologists.
Her recommendation that the way to understand the formation of a medieval letter-form is to copy it from the manuscript is sound, though I would dispute her claim that this process has been frowned upon by paleographers (86).
In these pages philologists join linguists, grammarians, social and economic historians, paleographers, "text-critical" scholars, and literary historians.
The promotional material on the front Map of the book reflects a desire to reach a broad audience--not only "musicologists, philologists, paleographers, codicologists and historians" but also the "non-specialist public interested in learning more about a somewhat obscure part of written cultural heritage." To facilitate the use of this book, Hispania Vetus includes a glossary of terms with the aim of helping "nonspecialists understand the liturgical and musicological terminology in this book" (p.